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Old 01-29-2016, 12:21 PM   #1
eturgeon
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OLED PC monitor for eye relief?

I'm curious to know if the OLED technology could be the savior for everyone who is turning to e-ink to relieve the eye strain problem, due to the backlight emitted from led/LCD monitors. From what I understand, OLED monitor emit less light, and most of the screen can actually be transparent. Used as computer monitor, it could be useful for someone who wishes to reduce the light to the minimum. Any known studies ?
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Old 02-21-2016, 11:16 AM   #2
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The eye strain is sort of related to the technology but sort of not. The root cause of eye strain is flicker rate. The flicker rate of CRTs, LEDs, and OLEDs and even fluorescent lights bothers some people (like me). US monitors generally flicker at 60hz, but can go to 70hz by changing a setting either on the monitor itself, or from the OS, higher if you want to pay a premium. So, I've never head of the TYPE of screen being an issue, but the flicker rate is. So try to find a reader/monitor with a higher flicker rate over 70mhz. For those who suffer eye strain, 70mhz is often not high enough, but the "faster" monitors can be quite expensive and hard to find in the US.

I use a program called Flux on my Windows PC and it removes blue tones throughout the day, and automatically removes more blue tones from the screen later in the day. I can set it the way I want and it does help decrease my eye strain. But still, I do have to take breaks and use eye drops to lubricate my eyes.

Last edited by crankypants; 02-21-2016 at 11:19 AM.
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Old 02-26-2016, 11:09 AM   #3
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I heard a long time ago about the frame rate issue on CRT, but from what I understand, this issue as totally disappeared on LCD.

"A CRT redraws the entire screen with a new frame, hence the term framerate/refresh rate. Thus, if you run at 60 Hz refresh rate, your eye sees 60 new frames every second. LCDs don't refresh in this way - they simply change the color of the pixel as it needs updated."

Hence, if your problem is related to frame rate with the old CRT monitors, it's impossible for you to experience the same issue with LCD.

That being said, my problem is simply light related: the more light, the more headaches. It's as simple as that. For instance, I once bought a luminotherapy lamp, which has a strong lamp, and tried it an evening, for like 30 minutes, while reading a book. The lamp was standing 2 meters in front of me. I was not looking directly at it, since my eyes were oriented on my book, but in my field of vision, the lamp was present. It resulted in a headache that lasted the whole night, and even during the day after that. This was my first experience with this problem, that only got worst year after year. This was about 6 years ago.

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Old 02-26-2016, 11:14 AM   #4
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I also tried Flux, did nothing for me.

About 95% of the articles about computer vision syndrome on the internet describe symptoms and causes that seem to have no connection at all with my problem. Advices about posture, stress, or that blue light that keeps you awake at night, or what not. I bought an anti blue light for my monitor: did nothing. I get headaches by watching TV after 30 minutes, watching stuff that do not stress me, that's for sure.
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Old 02-26-2016, 11:55 AM   #5
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OLED screens are still a light emitting technology. If people have them up brighter than the surroundings, they may have problems.

The point of E-INK type screens is that the only reflect ambient light, just like a sheet of paper does. (Well, except that some now have a light layer on the front, which if turned too high can cause just the same problems as any other display.)
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Old 02-26-2016, 03:17 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eturgeon View Post
I heard a long time ago about the frame rate issue on CRT, but from what I understand, this issue as totally disappeared on LCD.

"A CRT redraws the entire screen with a new frame, hence the term framerate/refresh rate. Thus, if you run at 60 Hz refresh rate, your eye sees 60 new frames every second. LCDs don't refresh in this way - they simply change the color of the pixel as it needs updated."

Hence, if your problem is related to frame rate with the old CRT monitors, it's impossible for you to experience the same issue with LCD.

Then why do all my LCD monitors have an adjustable framerate setting? Normally I can adjust it from 60 to 70hz. This one is adjusted from Windows 8 Control Panel. Right click Desktop, Choose Screen Resolution. Click Advanced settings. Click Monitor tab or Intel HD Graphics Control Panel tab if you have an Intel video chip. I can choose from 60 or 75hz.

But it's good if you found out what works for you.

Last edited by crankypants; 02-26-2016 at 03:21 PM.
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Old 02-28-2016, 10:51 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crankypants View Post
Then why do all my LCD monitors have an adjustable framerate setting? Normally I can adjust it from 60 to 70hz. This one is adjusted from Windows 8 Control Panel. Right click Desktop, Choose Screen Resolution. Click Advanced settings. Click Monitor tab or Intel HD Graphics Control Panel tab if you have an Intel video chip. I can choose from 60 or 75hz..
eturgeon is right the things are different with the LCD monitors. On the old vacuum tube monitors the display was literally blinking.
Now the display is only changing the color if there is new image. So if the screen show yellow color and it keeps this in time there wont be any changes in the pixels and there wont be changes or blinking at all.If there is something moving the screen the color of the pixel changes from one color to another. Here important is the response time which shows how long the pixel needs to change from one color to another. They usually refers from one shade to another grey shade (grey to grey, gtg ). On the LCD monitors the refresh rate mean how often the monitor is trying to refresh the screen and put new images. The response time shows how long it will take the pixel to change its colors. That's why on the 3D monitors where a high refresh rate is needed (at least 120, i.e. 60 for both eyes) the screens are made with very low response time 1 or 2 ms. If the response time is higher the screens cant keep up with the refresh rate and the image will blur.

But actually on many monitors there is other source of blinking, the back-light. Many monitors screens use PWM back-light brightness control i.e. the LEDs on the backlight are blinking to reduce the brightness. But after many complains especially online most companies offer many monitors that doesn't have PWM but instead direct linear control of the LED. So if something is blinking on the LCD monitor this is its back-light.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eturgeon View Post
That being said, my problem is simply light related: the more light, the more headaches. It's as simple as that. For instance, I once bought a luminotherapy lamp, which has a strong lamp, and tried it an evening, for like 30 minutes, while reading a book. The lamp was standing 2 meters in front of me. I was not looking directly at it, since my eyes were oriented on my book, but in my field of vision, the lamp was present. It resulted in a headache that lasted the whole night, and even during the day after that. This was my first experience with this problem, that only got worst year after year. This was about 6 years ago.
Putting light source in your sight is always bad. If the book is darker than this light source i.e. the lamp this mean eye strain and fatigue. This because you are staring at darker object when you have strong light coming in your eyes. The proper lighting for you is lighting coming above you or behind you. If this for your house better use some kind of diffuse lighting - lamps that lights the sealing not the room itself. Also you have less bright spots in this way.

And about the low blue light not every one says that this is bad. Check Philips for example. http://dryeyestrain.blogspot.bg/2016...-all-fuse.html

"With its unique LightFrame technology Philips has continued on a long tradition of putting innovation to a meaningful use. LightFrame technology is based on the scientific tenet that blue light passed through the eye's third receptor refreshes your biological clock, energizes you, and gives you a greater sense of well-being. By using specially developed exclusive materials, Philips LightFrame display emits a specific wavelength blue light from it's bezel helping you to reduce eye fatigue and improving your concentration even after long periods of time in front of the screen".

They say that they are reducing the eye fatigue using blue light.
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Old 03-04-2016, 10:46 AM   #8
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Putting light source in your sight is always bad.
That's true. But even so, my reaction is abnormal. I give you another example: I bought myself a wacom Cintiq 22'', the drawing device, cause I love to draw. It was some months after the lamp experience. I was soooo excited when I got it out of the box! But then, I plugged it. It seemed quite bright to my eyes, so as soon as it was installed, I started to check to calibrate it, so I would be easier on my eyes. But by the time I finished (maybe 15 minutes to do install + calibrate), I got a very big headache. It was so unconfortable, that I panicked: have I just bought a $2400 device that my eyes can't tolerate, and makes me sick? Turns out, I got better after a day or two, but only to get to the point where the brightness/contrast is confortable enough to allow me to work on the device 1 hour, top. Past one hour, I need to lay on my bed for about 10-15 minutes, so that the headache go away.

I have since totally stopped using the Cintiq, and I almost don't use computers at all for recreation.

Last edited by eturgeon; 03-04-2016 at 10:50 AM.
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Old 03-04-2016, 10:53 AM   #9
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Then why do all my LCD monitors have an adjustable framerate setting?

that is to inhance the experience, especially for gaming. Like NICHIRENSHU explained. But even a frame rate of 10 fps would not be harder on the eyes to look at. It would just look like an old stop-motion movie.
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