Register Guidelines E-Books Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Go Back   MobileRead Forums > E-Book Uploads - Patricia Clark Memorial Library > ePub Books

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-08-2014, 07:14 AM   #1
GrannyGrump
Obsessively Dedicated...
GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
GrannyGrump's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,216
Karma: 25025468
Join Date: May 2011
Location: JAPAN (US expatriate)
Device: Sony PRS-T2, ADE on PC
Twain, Mark: Life on the Mississippi (Illustrated). v1. 8 July 2014

LIFE ON THE MISSISSIPPI (Illustrated)

by Mark Twain (Samuel Langhorne Clemens) [1835 – 1910]

First published in 1883.
The text of this book is in the public domain world-wide, because the author died more than 100 years ago. Illustrations and introductory material are in the public domain in countries where copyright is “Life+70” or less.

Mark Twain is most noted for his novels, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), the latter often called “the Great American Novel.” Some of his other works include Innocents Abroad, A Tramp Abroad, Roughing It, The Prince and the Pauper, and many others.

This is a memoir of Twain’s days as a steamboat pilot on the Mississippi River before the American Civil War, and also a travel book, recounting his visit to the river many years after the War. The book opens with a brief history of the river, beginning with its discovery by the Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto in 1542. Then we come to the heart and soul of the book – the story of Twain’s time as an apprentice steamboat pilot. He describes, with humor and affection, the art and science of navigating the ever-changing Mississippi River.

In the second part of the book, Twain narrates his return to the river two decades after his career as a river pilot was ended by the war – traveling by steamboat, south from St. Louis to New Orleans, and then north the entire length of the river. He describes the changes in the river and the shipping industry, the decline of some towns and cities, the prosperous growth of others, and adds his observations on greed, gullibility, tragedy, and bad architecture. There are tall tales to be found here, as well as a few “Old American Indian Legends,” some of them doubtless from the pen of the author himself.

—Some of the above adapted from Wikipedia.


Here is a taste to tickle your palate:

Spoiler:
When I went up to my room, I found there the young man called Rogers, crying. Rogers was not his name; neither was Jones, Brown, Dexter, Ferguson, Bascom, nor Thompson; but he answered to either of these that a body found handy in an emergency; or to any other name, in fact, if he perceived that you meant him. He said:

“What is a person to do here when he wants a drink of water? – drink this slush?”

“Can’t you drink it?”

“I could if I had some other water to wash it with.”

Here was a thing which had not changed; a score of years had not affected this water’s mulatto complexion in the least; a score of centuries would succeed no better, perhaps. It comes out of the turbulent, bank-caving Missouri, and every tumblerful of it holds nearly an acre of land in solution. I got this fact from the bishop of the diocese. If you will let your glass stand half an hour, you can separate the land from the water as easy as Genesis; and then you will find them both good: the one good to eat, the other good to drink. The land is very nourishing, the water is thoroughly wholesome. The one appeases hunger; the other, thirst. But the natives do not take them separately, but together, as nature mixed them. When they find an inch of mud in the bottom of a glass, they stir it up, and then take the draught as they would gruel. It is difficult for a stranger to get used to this batter, but once used to it he will prefer it to water. This is really the case. It is good for steamboating, and good to drink; but it is worthless for all other purposes, except baptizing.


And one Old Indian Legend which I simply have to share with you, because it happened just a few miles from where I grew up...

Spoiler:
“When you were talking of Maiden’s Rock, you spoke of the long-departed Winona, darling of Indian song and story. Is she the maiden of the rock? – and are the two connected by legend?”

“Yes, and a very tragic and painful one. Perhaps the most celebrated, as well as the most pathetic, of all the legends of the Mississippi.”

We asked him to tell it. He dropped out of his conversational vein and back into his lecture-gait without an effort, and rolled on as follows:

“A little distance above Lake City is a famous point known as Maiden’s Rock, which is not only a picturesque spot, but is full of romantic interest from the event which gave it its name, Not many years ago this locality was a favorite resort for the Sioux Indians on account of the fine fishing and hunting to be had there, and large numbers of them were always to be found in this locality. Among the families which used to resort here, was one belonging to the tribe of Wabasha. We-no-na (first-born) was the name of a maiden who had plighted her troth to a lover belonging to the same band. But her stern parents had promised her hand to another, a famous warrior, and insisted on her wedding him. The day was fixed by her parents, to her great grief. She appeared to accede to the proposal and accompany them to the rock, for the purpose of gathering flowers for the feast. On reaching the rock, We-no-na ran to its summit and standing on its edge upbraided her parents who were below, for their cruelty, and then singing a death-dirge, threw herself from the precipice and dashed them in pieces on the rock below.”

“Dashed who in pieces – her parents?”

“Yes.”

“Well, it certainly was a tragic business, as you say. And moreover, there is a startling kind of dramatic surprise about it which I was not looking for. It is a distinct improvement upon the threadbare form of Indian legend. There are fifty Lover’s Leaps along the Mississippi from whose summit disappointed Indian girls have jumped, but this is the only jump in the lot hat turned out in the right and satisfactory way. What became of Winona?”

“She was a good deal jarred up and jolted; but she got herself together and disappeared before the coroner reached the fatal spot; and ’tis said she sought and married her true love, and wandered with him to some distant clime, where she lived happy ever after, her gentle spirit mellowed and chastened by the romantic incident which had so early deprived her of the sweet guidance of a mother’s love and a father’s protecting arm, and thrown her, all unfriended, upon the cold charity of a censorious world.”


Wasn't that educational?

-----

Editing notes ---

Text is based on Gutenberg.org transcription of the 1893 first edition; proofed and corrected against the 1923 Definitive Edition, resulting in some spelling and punctuation revision, and restoration of some missing text fragments. I formatted punctuation, diacritics, and italics; added scene breaks; and cross-linked chapter-end-notes to source paragraphs; chapter heads to html table of contents. Embedded fonts for drop-caps, small-caps, and fleurons.

Included are all 316 illustrations from the first edition, including the “suppressed” depiction of Twain in flames (chapter 43), which was removed upon the objection of his wife -- subsequent printings of the first edition omit this image. Also includes the 5 illustrations from the 1899 “Uniform Edition.” Unfortunately I could not include the 12 images from the special illustrated "holiday edition" issued in 1927 -- the artist Walter Stewart lived until at least 1978.

Due to file-size, I split this into three volumes. The “DropCaps” version has illustrations in slightly larger resolution; all images are centered.

I promised this long ago, and finally finished. Any and all feedback most gratefully accepted -- please do let me know if you find errors or format glitches.
This work is assumed to be in the Life+70 public domain OR the copyright holder has given specific permission for distribution. Copyright laws differ throughout the world, and it may still be under copyright in some countries. Before downloading, please check your country's copyright laws. If the book is under copyright in your country, do not download or redistribute this work.

To report a copyright violation you can contact us here.

Last edited by GrannyGrump; 07-08-2014 at 07:18 AM.
GrannyGrump is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 08:56 AM   #2
Ralph Sir Edward
Retired
Ralph Sir Edward ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Ralph Sir Edward ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Ralph Sir Edward ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Ralph Sir Edward ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Ralph Sir Edward ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Ralph Sir Edward ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Ralph Sir Edward ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Ralph Sir Edward ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Ralph Sir Edward ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Ralph Sir Edward ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Ralph Sir Edward ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
Posts: 10,109
Karma: 27871502
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: 5 generation native Texan
Device: BeBook/Openinkpot, CYbook 3rd gen awaiting RTF software upgrade
Thanks, GrannyGrump
Ralph Sir Edward is offline   Reply With Quote
Advert
Old 07-08-2014, 09:22 AM   #3
doubleshuffle
Unicycle Daredevil
doubleshuffle ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.doubleshuffle ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.doubleshuffle ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.doubleshuffle ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.doubleshuffle ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.doubleshuffle ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.doubleshuffle ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.doubleshuffle ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.doubleshuffle ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.doubleshuffle ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.doubleshuffle ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
doubleshuffle's Avatar
 
Posts: 13,868
Karma: 182888522
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Planet of the Pudding Brains
Device: Aura HD (R.I.P. After six years the USB socket died.) tolino shine 3
Woohoo! Here it is!! Thank you so much!!!
doubleshuffle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2014, 02:54 AM   #4
brauronios
Member
brauronios is clearly one to watchbrauronios is clearly one to watchbrauronios is clearly one to watchbrauronios is clearly one to watchbrauronios is clearly one to watchbrauronios is clearly one to watchbrauronios is clearly one to watchbrauronios is clearly one to watchbrauronios is clearly one to watchbrauronios is clearly one to watchbrauronios is clearly one to watch
 
Posts: 11
Karma: 10746
Join Date: Jul 2012
Device: kindle
Splendid Work!
brauronios is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2014, 06:02 AM   #5
GrannyGrump
Obsessively Dedicated...
GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.GrannyGrump ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
GrannyGrump's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,216
Karma: 25025468
Join Date: May 2011
Location: JAPAN (US expatriate)
Device: Sony PRS-T2, ADE on PC
Bless you all. I hope you enjoy the read.
GrannyGrump is offline   Reply With Quote
Advert
Old 07-14-2014, 11:25 AM   #6
Tired 'N Grumpy
Connoisseur
Tired 'N Grumpy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Tired 'N Grumpy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Tired 'N Grumpy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Tired 'N Grumpy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Tired 'N Grumpy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Tired 'N Grumpy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Tired 'N Grumpy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Tired 'N Grumpy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Tired 'N Grumpy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Tired 'N Grumpy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Tired 'N Grumpy ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
Posts: 62
Karma: 578732
Join Date: Sep 2013
Device: iPad/ibooks
Beautiful work GrannyGrump. Thank you very much.
TnG
Tired 'N Grumpy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
memoir, mississipi river, post-civil war america, social life and customs, travel

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Other Fiction Twain, Mark & Warner, C.D.: The Gilded Age (Illustrated). v. 1, 10 March 2014 GrannyGrump ePub Books 11 04-09-2014 05:30 AM
Short Fiction Twain, Mark: A Dog's Tale (Illustrated). v2. 21 January 2014 GrannyGrump ePub Books 1 01-21-2014 01:02 AM
Twain, Mark: Life on the Mississippi. v1, 2 Jan 2008 Madam Broshkina BBeB/LRF Books 1 01-03-2008 03:54 AM
Twain, Mark: Life on the Mississippi. v1, 2 Jan 2008 Madam Broshkina IMP Books 0 01-02-2008 06:41 PM
Twain, Mark: Life on the Mississippi. v1, 2 Jan 2008 Madam Broshkina Kindle Books 0 01-02-2008 06:37 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:00 AM.


MobileRead.com is a privately owned, operated and funded community.