Thread: JBPatch
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Old 08-24-2012, 10:18 AM   #560
geekmaster
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Regarding seeing the "unseen":

I was in a projection booth at a movie theater, talking to the projectionist, when he pointed out the "cigarette burn" in the upper right corner five seconds before the end of reel, when he needed to switch projectors to seemlessly start the next reel. This burn mark was originally done with a real cigarette on the film, to notify the projectionist when it was time to flip the switch between projectors, to start showing the next film reel.

Since I was made aware of that, I started seeing it even on TV showings of old movies. Sometimes it is stretched to an oval when projected through an anamorphic lens. You will see after the burn mark up to five seconds of trivial content with no dialog, during which you can switch to the next scene on the next reel at any time, and the next reel can start with up to five seconds of trivial content. You cut between "reel boundary" scenes at any time during those five seconds.

And now that I told you, you will see them too (on old films). Modern projectors may use very large reels (perhaps on platters) and do not need reel switching. And the latest projectors are all digital. But old movies often still have burn marks. Watch for them. Sadly, they may be cropped off when converting widescreen films to pan&scan ("fullscreen") for TV.

Last edited by geekmaster; 08-24-2012 at 10:21 AM.
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