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Old 09-13-2021, 05:30 PM   #3227
CRussel
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The Shugak books (and to a lesser extent, the Liam Campbell books) tend to build over time. While I've enjoyed them all, the one I am most likely to re-listen to is Breakup, number 9. It still has me laughing uncontrollably in spots, even though I know what's coming.

Martin Walker's Bruno, Chief of Police is the antithesis of Harry Bosch. (And, fwiw, I love both.) He's a village cop who's as much village social worker and chef as he is cop, but the flavour of the Dordogne is everywhere.

Simenon's Inspector Maigret is one you'll either like a lot, or not at all. Very French.

The Elizabeth Peters Amelia Peabody series are historical and quite amusing, while you'll learn a good bit about archeology.

The Jaqueline Winspear books are also historical, though all post WWI.

Another one you might consider are the Peter Robinson Inspector Banks series has several different narrators. My DW loves them, I've had problems getting too far into the series for some reason. Robinson is Canadian, but the books are set in the UK.
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