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Old 11-26-2013, 11:16 PM   #3
Lynx-lynx
Grace Cossington Smith
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Posts: 3,827
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Join Date: May 2012
Location: Australia
Device: Blackberry Playbook, Sony 650, Kobo Glo, Kobo H2O, Kobo Aura One
Kobo Aus has got Gregory Blake's

Eureka Stockade
$6.99 and discountable (unlimited50 works at the time of posting)

Quote:
“This is far and away the most accurate and authoritative account
of the actual battle of Eureka. An outstanding job of sorting fact
from myth.” Peter FitzSimons.

Eureka Stockade: A ferocious and bloody battle, is the epic account of the battle for the Eureka Stockade, an iconic moment in Australian history. On the chilly dawn morning of 3 December 1854 British soldiers and police of the Victorian colonial government attacked and stormed a crudely-built fortification erected by insurgent gold miners at the Eureka lead on the Ballarat Gold Diggings. The fighting was intense, the carnage appalling and the political consequences of the affair profound.

This book, for the first time, examines in great detail the actual military events that unfolded during the twenty minutes of deadly fighting at Eureka. Many of the old assumptions about what occurred that day are turned on the heads, raising in their places provocative questions. Were the intentions of the Eureka diggers as pacific as tradition insists? How was it that men supposedly poorly armed and taken completely by surprise in their sleep were able to deliver ‘sharp and well directed’ fire on their attackers? How close, in fact did the assaulting infantry come to failing in their task, and why has the pivotal part played by the police in the battle been ignored in every retelling of the Eureka story? Why have the Americans, who played a decisive part in the defence of the stockade been all but ignored?

The author argues convincingly that Eureka was not a wanton massacre of innocents, as it has been portrayed. Rather it was a hard fought military engagement. Eureka was a decisive moment in Australian history and in this book it comes alive in a rousing and original manner.
Timely read coming up to the anniversary - 3 December (1854)

Interesting how the expression 'Eureka' and 'it was a Eureka moment' has cottoned on through the English speaking world
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