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Old 05-21-2019, 06:30 AM   #24
BookCat
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Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Birmingham UK
Device: Sony e-reader 505, Kindle Paperwhite 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrustratedReader View Post
If you copy it (possible for free with a paperback by cutting off spine and scanning in sheet feeder), then you MUST destroy all your copies if passing it one as a gift or by reselling.
When I was at uni, many eons ago, the library often had multiple photocopies of set reading chapters. Other photocopies would be available on short term loans because they were being frequently accessed at that time.
The point being that it appears to be legal to have multiple copies of paper books, but not ebooks. I realise there's an exception for academic/research purposes, so how does this apply to, for example, academic ebooks?

Many of the things I had to read were in continuous text, suited to an eink reader (literary criticism, philosophy etc) and much of it is probably available on eink now.

Just musing . . .
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