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Old 12-01-2018, 07:20 AM   #2
issybird
o saeclum infacetum
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Choices with one or two nominations:

*Foreigner by C.J. Cherryh [CRussel]
AmazonUS: $2.99 | AmazonCA: $9.99 | Audible | AudibleUK | Overdrive
Spoiler:
Quote:
Originally Posted by amazon
The groundbreaking novel that launched Cherryh's eponymous space opera series of first contact and its consequences...

It had been nearly five centuries since the starship Phoenix, lost in space and desperately searching for the nearest G5 star, had encountered the planet of the atevi. On this alien world, law was kept by the use of registered assassination, alliances were defined by individual loyalties not geographical borders, and war became inevitable once humans and one faction of atevi established a working relationship. It was a war that humans had no chance of winning on this planet so many light-years from home.

Now, nearly two hundred years after that conflict, humanity has traded its advanced technology for peace and an island refuge that no atevi will ever visit. Then the sole human the treaty allows into atevi society is marked for an assassin's bullet. The work of an isolated lunatic? The interests of a particular faction? Or the consequence of one human's fondness for a species which has fourteen words for betrayal and not a single word for love?
431 pp.

**The Time In Between (alternate title: The Seamstress) by Maria Duenas, translated by Daniel Hahn [Catlady, Bookworm_Girl]
Amazon U.S.
$13.99 | Amazon CA $7.99 | Amazon UK £3.99 | Amazon AU AU $12.99 |
Kobo U.S.
$13.99 | Kobo CA $12.99 | Kobo UK £3.99 | Kobo AU $12.99
Spoiler:
Quote:
The inspiring international bestseller of a seemingly ordinary woman who uses her talent and courage to transform herself first into a prestigious couturier and then into an undercover agent for the Allies during World War II.

Between Youth and Adulthood…

At age twelve, Sira Quiroga sweeps the atelier floors where her single mother works as a seamstress. At fourteen, she quietly begins her own apprenticeship. By her early twenties she has learned the ropes of the business and is engaged to a modest government clerk. But everything changes when two charismatic men burst unexpectedly into her neatly mapped-out life: an attractive salesman and the father she never knew.

Between War and Peace…

With the Spanish Civil War brewing in Madrid, Sira leaves her mother and her fiancé, impetuously following her handsome lover to Morocco. However, she soon finds herself abandoned, penniless, and heartbroken in an exotic land. Among the odd collection of European expatriates trapped there by the worsening political situation back on the Continent, Sira reinvents herself by turning to the one skill that can save her: her gift for creating beautiful clothes.

Between Love and Duty…

As England, Germany, and the other great powers launch into the dire conflict of World War II, Sira is persuaded to return to Madrid, where she takes on a new identity to embark upon the most dangerous undertaking of her career. As the preeminent couturier for an eager clientele of Nazi officers’ wives, Sira becomes embroiled in the half-lit world of espionage and political conspiracy rife with love, intrigue, and betrayal.

An outstanding success around the world, The Time in Between has sold more than two million copies and inspired the Spanish television series based on the book, dubbed by the media as the “Spanish Downton Abbey.” In the US it was a critical and commercial hit, and a New York Times bestseller in paperback. It is one of those rare, richly textured novels that enthrall down to the last page. María Dueñas reminds us how it feels to be swept away by a masterful storyteller.
626 pp.

**The Cyberiad: Fables for the Cybernetic Age by Stanislaw Lem [Ralph Sir Edward, Dazrin]
Amazon US $1.99
314 pp.

*Celebrating the Best in Urdu Poetry, edited by Khushwant Singh, tr. by Kamna Prasad [stuartjmz]
Amazon US $14.00
Spoiler:
This nomination is close to my heart, because I was ecstatic when I discovered that it even existed. Hindi and Urdu are/were a digraphia, but despite their closeness, Urdu was long revered as the more poetic of the two. For me, Urdu's nastaliq is insanely gorgeous, the most beautiful script I know of, but I can't read a single letter. So discovering an anthology of Urdu poetry in devanagari (which I can read), with both Roman transliteration and English translation, was a joy.

Last edited by issybird; 12-07-2018 at 06:32 AM. Reason: Through post #65.
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