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Old 01-31-2020, 10:10 PM   #27
Alanon
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Alanon once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.Alanon once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.Alanon once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.Alanon once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.Alanon once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.Alanon once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.Alanon once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.Alanon once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.Alanon once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.Alanon once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.Alanon once ate a cherry pie in a record 7 seconds.
 
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Posts: 59
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Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Serbia
Device: Kobo Aura One
I'm a bit late to the party, but I'll chime in, as I'm a bit of a dictionary nerd and quite like fiddling with them on my Kobo.

I believe that Kindles use the ODE (Oxford Dictionary of English), which is not the OED (Oxford English Dictionary), nor is it based on that venerable enterprise. It's a modern single-volume dictionary that OUP produced twenty-odd years ago. The dictionary that is based on the OED is called the Shorter Oxford English Dictionary (SOED) and, unlike the OED, is much more frequently updated in print form and is currently in its sixth edition.

That being said, it is possible to get the (more or less) complete OED on a Kobo, and it works just fine speed-wise, the size and scope don't seem to be an issue. That's certainly the most comprehensive dictionary available, though it's not exactly the most user-friendly. I removed the quotations from the one I converted, and it can still get a bit prickly to navigate through the data. Some references can still have dozens of Kobo popup pages, which is far from ideal. Perhaps it's due to the way in which I made it, but the SOED is a much more practical solution in most situations. I haven't used the ODE for a while, but I remember the SOED being similar to it, yet more comprehensive due to the OED parentage.

Another middle-ground would be the equally venerable Webster's Third International. Not as comprehensive as the OED, but the entries can be a good deal shorter. For all its advantages and somewhat legendary cultural status, Webster's Third suffers from occasional stodginess. If you'd like a chuckle, look up Webster's definition of "door". Though most of its quirks were expunged from the modern, online-only edition, the spirit of Webster's remains in those defining moments.

Outside of these, I should probably mention American Heritage Dictionary and Random House Webster's Unabridged (not related to Webster's Third). I have a habit of not using them, though they are very robust, modern dictionaries with no-nonsense definitions, usually well-formulated and clear, if a bit short on examples. For the literary-minded, a good choice is also Webster's 1912 dictionary - though it took me a while to track down a version that didn't omit the best bits - the extensive quotations. For a quick look-up, the best path is probably something like Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, that simply lists out synonyms rather intelligently.

Most of these I have on me, either in a format that Kobo will read or in a digital form that might be converted for Kobo, so feel free to hit me up for anything.
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