View Single Post
Old 05-06-2021, 12:52 PM   #3143
Catlady
Grand Sorcerer
Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
Catlady's Avatar
 
Posts: 6,938
Karma: 46844516
Join Date: Oct 2010
Device: Kindle Fire, Kindle Paperwhite, AGPTek Bluetooth Clip
The newest books by three of my go-to suspense authors have been huge disappointments.

Harlan Coben's Win is awful. I feel like Coben's been going downhill for a while, but this was like a rollercoaster drop. The protagonist is apparently a character in Coben's Myron Bolitar series--which seems like a cheat; I've read only the Coben standalones and had no interest in Myron Bolitar. If this book is a window into that series, I've been right to steer clear. The plot is boring, and the protagonist is an amoral ass--and not in a fun way.

Peter Swanson's Every Vow You Break has a decent if fairly familiar premise--new bride's one-night stand stalks her--but a twist turned it into an unrealistic mess. I like twists, but not when they morph a domestic thriller into something else entirely.

But I still had Linwood Barclay's latest to look forward to; surely he at least would come through, I thought. Alas, no. His Find You First is implausible and dull--a terminally ill millionaire/former sperm donor searches for his now-adult biological children, both to leave them money and to warn them that his illness might be genetic; meanwhile, someone else is looking for them too.

What all three novels have in common are filthy-rich men as heroes and/or villains; the power they wield and the resources they are able to employ make the stories improbable and ultimately unrelatable.

The narrators are all good--Steven Weber, Karissa Vacker, and George Newbern, respectively--but narrators can't save these stories.
Catlady is offline   Reply With Quote