View Single Post
Old 05-04-2011, 06:35 AM   #26
rhadin
Literacy = Understanding
rhadin ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rhadin ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rhadin ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rhadin ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rhadin ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rhadin ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rhadin ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rhadin ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rhadin ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rhadin ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rhadin ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
rhadin's Avatar
 
Posts: 4,397
Karma: 45320944
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: The World of Books
Device: Nook, Nook Tablet
Although I have mentioned these books many times before, I think they are worth mentioning yet again, especially in this thread: Shayne Parkinson's Promises to Keep quartet. I originally reviewed the books a year ago on my blog (see On Books: The Promises to Keep Quartet).

The books are set in late 19th century to early 20th century New Zealand. The story focuses on Amy Leith and how Victorian morality affected her life in what was then the frontier of the British Empire.

I consider these books to be classics, to be very-high-quality literary historical fiction for many reasons, not the least of which is that a year after having read the books, I still think about them. I still want to put my arms around Amy and tell her all will be right; I still want to physically thrash her husband and older son; I still want to rescue her from an unforgiving and unfair (to women) culture that was really simply another form of slavery.

I am still, one year later, moved by and thinking about the characters and the books in this series.

Interestingly (at least to me), my wife also still speaks about these books even though she read them on my recommendation shortly after I read them. More importantly, when her friends ask for a recommendation, these are still the first books she recommends, and she and several of her friends continue to discuss the books. To me, these are the signs that a book (or series) are classics.

The first book, Sentence of Marriage, is available free at Smashwords; the other books in the series cost $1.99 each. I wish these books were available as hardcovers. I'd gladly buy them for my permanent collection and as gifts for people who I know who do not read ebooks.
rhadin is offline   Reply With Quote