View Single Post
Old 09-15-2009, 11:08 PM   #1
Patricia
Reader
Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
Patricia's Avatar
 
Posts: 11,505
Karma: 8720163
Join Date: May 2007
Location: South Wales, UK
Device: Sony PRS-500, PRS-505, Asus EEEpc 4G
Pascal, Blaise: Pensées, v1, 16 September 2009.

Blaise Pascal (1623–1662)
Pensées [“Thoughts”]
With an Introduction by T. S. Eliot (1888–1965)
1958.

This is from Project Gutenberg. I was surprised to see Eliot’s Introduction, but can only suppose that either he failed to renew the U.S. copyright, or his estate has given permission for its reproduction. The people at PG are punctilious about copyright and explicitly say that the work is out of copyright in the USA.

From T. S. Eliot’s Introduction:
“I know of no religious writer more pertinent to our time. The great mystics like St. John of the Cross, are primarily for readers with a special determination of purpose; the devotional writers, such as St. François de Sales, are primarily for those who already feel consciously desirous of the love of God; the great theologians are for those interested in theology. But I can think of no Christian writer, not Newman even, more to be commended than Pascal to those who doubt, but who have the mind to conceive, and the sensibility to feel, the disorder, the futility, the meaninglessness, the mystery of life and suffering, and who can only find peace through a satisfaction of the whole being.”

I have added curly quotes, smart italics, and corrected some obvious errors in Latin quotations.

We already have another edition of the Pensées, in RWood’s Harvard Classics series, volume XLVII. We have used the same anonymous translation, but my version differs in several respects:
1. Mine has T. S. Eliot’s Introduction.
2. Mine has different notes, and considerably more of them. Also I have laid them out differently.
3. I have restored a passage of Greek text and some diagrams.
4. Mine has a hyperlinked index.
Patricia is offline   Reply With Quote