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Old 01-15-2019, 10:22 AM   #7
astrangerhere
Professor of Law
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Quote:
Originally Posted by issybird View Post
The take on sex/gender/sexuality was determinative and explicitly a case of either/or, whether it be masculine/feminine or gendered/androgynous. It's heteronormative and what comes across as extremely biased in its attitudes toward women. I don't know enough about Le Guin to know whether that reflected her own attitudes or whether she was projecting her sense of what men think; I suspect that it's some of both.
I agree! It brought to mind Ann Leckie's Ancillary trilogy where her narrator, having no concept of gender defaulted to using feminine pronouns for everyone in the books. I know this is probably heresy, but I feel like Leckie pulled it off better.

And, of course, there were the passing references to us pesky gays as deviants, even in the non-gendered world of Winter.

(Sorry for the double post!)
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