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Old 01-05-2019, 06:33 PM   #6
Bookworm_Girl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnotherCat View Post
I also found the use of the cat interesting in that they are regarded as lucky in Japanese culture (so I am told) yet was Satoru lucky? - I don't know but I think in some way he was as he was able to accept his journeys to his ultimate fate, that which we don't know for sure until late in the book, with calm and goodwill with his cat companion.
Your question reminded me of a conversation with Sugi who asks Satoru, "How can you be a good person when you've been so unlucky?"
Quote:
“I don’t know if I’m a good person or not. But either way, I wasn’t unlucky.” (Satoru)
“What are you talking about? Are you denying that life’s treated you unfairly, and trying to make me feel bad by not admitting it?” (Sugi)
“I don’t know what you mean. The wine must have gone to your head.” (Satoru)
(Kindle Locations 1665-1668)
I believe that Satoru genuinely thought that he was not unlucky in life. Each obstacle in his life's journey introduced him to new friends and a new set of experiences that he shared with his friends (such as swimming, gardening or working together in the orchards). It enriched him. I loved this statement in the epilogue after his friends meet with his Aunt Noriko and share stories.
Quote:
You know something, Satoru? After you passed away, the people who miss you all became connected. (Kindle Locations 2787-2788)
Their friendship with one individual and love for him expanded into a larger network, and I thought that was beautiful. It was another example of an unfair & unlucky event in life turning into a positive outcome.

Here is a short article on cats in Japanese culture and history.
https://www.kcpinternational.com/201...e-and-history/
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