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Old 12-17-2018, 08:34 PM   #14
Bookworm_Girl
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I just finished the book today. I'm really glad that we read a book from this region so I think we definitely achieved the monthly topic's purpose. Thank you for the link to the interview, AnotherCat. It was very helpful to add some context from the author's life to the city's historical struggles.

I like the way the book was structured, and the chapters were titled. The humor prevented the book from being too macabre, and I thought the fantastical elements fit in the story and were not too absurd. It was a colorful cast of characters, and I felt like you got a flavor of the local neighborhood. I found this article that tells more about Bataween and the development of the book.
https://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/17/w...og-of-war.html
Quote:
“The most important thing that has happened to me is that I am still alive,” he said.

Yet as friends have died, or left the country, he has stayed.

“It’s an internal conflict for me,” he said, “between my need to write novels and be connected to the people, and my fear of death and desire to keep living.”
I'm going to have to think some more about the parallels between this book and the original classic. I thought it was interesting that the monster developed a cult-like following of conflicting groups compared to Shelley's monster that was isolated. Although, the monster was composed of body parts from so many different religions, tribes, and classes. Therefore his reasons for revenge were many, more calculated, and kept altering whereas Shelley's monster's revenge was more singular and emotionally driven towards his creator. Both monsters struggle with their identity and purpose in society. There's a lot about the concept of justice to be pondered. Also Hadi seemed to be more a tool of Fate in creating the monster than Victor was the true father of his creation.

I read an article that said another reimagining of a classic set in this region is Atiq Rahimi’s A Curse on Dostoevsky about Kabul based on Crime and Punishment in this example).
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