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Old 11-10-2018, 05:52 PM   #24
Bookworm_Girl
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Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Southwest, USA
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I just watched the movie Mary Shelley and listened to Frankenstein recently. Good timing! I don't believe I have read any authors from Iraq so I'm excited about that. It looks to be a loose reimagining of the plot set in 2005. It sounds dark but an interesting perspective.

I definitely want to read The Tango Singer too and have added it to my TBR list. sun surfer, very interesting that you lived in Buenos Aires. I would like to do an expat assignment. Good for you experiencing the local culture and learning the tango!

Another book about Argentina which I would like to read is My Fathers' Ghost Is Climbing in the Rain by Patricio Pron (Author), Mara Faye Lethem (Translator).

Quote:
From Booklist
Pron’s American debut can best be described as a purposefully fragmented mystery narrative, unconstrained by the conventions of that or any other genre. Told “in whispers and with laughter and with tears,” it is a complex look at the legacy and mandate of social struggle in Argentina. A young writer with memory loss returns home to Argentina to say good-bye to his dying father, a journalist. In reviewing the father’s files, the son uncovers the older man’s obsession with the disappearance and murder of a local man whose sister was “disappeared” by the infamous Argentinean military dictatorship in the brutal 1970s. In piecing together the mystery, the son-narrator learns that his parents led secret lives as leaders of an underground Peronist resistance movement. This is a melancholy and chilling work of postmodernism, examining family, memory, and what collective fear does to a society. Pron brilliantly draws a line from individual crime, which interests few, to the epidemic of “social crime,” which transforms generations. From a major new voice in Spanish literature, this novel should grant Pron a much-deserved readership in the English-speaking world. --Jonathan Schwartz
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