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Old 06-06-2020, 06:04 PM   #29
ZodWallop
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fjtorres View Post
The story I heard is that his wordsmithing was poor and even on the first book "editing" amounted to a rewrite. The storytelling was excellent but the prose wasn't. A lot of newcomers have similar issues and outgrow them in later books. Clancy didn't. The core was great but the stories still needed extensive rewriting so they started crediting the ghosts.

Over time he did less and less until he could barely be listed as writing the story. But the books sold by the million. Eventually he tired of the game and sold the brand. By then the games were outproducing the books anyway.
The problem with your narrative is that it doesn't match reality and doesn't really make sense.

Clancy's first book, The Hunt for Red October was published by the United States Naval Institute Press, not exactly a publisher of popular bestsellers. They figured they would sell 5,000 copies, but the book was (for them) a runaway success. It sold 45,000 copies.

The book didn't really take off as a best seller until President Reagan praised it.

The point is, that doesn't sound like a book where a publisher figured they had a best seller on their hands. And at that point, Tom Clancy wasn't anyone special. If any of what you said was true, it would have made sense to team him up with a surer hand and publish them as a team.

Regarding the video games, Clancy was asked to help in the development of a video game based on his book SSN. From there, he got a few business partners and founded a small studio called Red Storm Entertainment. I'm not a Clancy expert, but I was very into video games and I do remember when LucasArts and Red Storm were independent studios.

Given all that, I don't buy Clancy (or Patterson for that matter) having ghost written works appearing solely under their byline. As I mentioned, I do remember when Teeth of the Tiger came out and it was clearly not written by Clancy. Grant Blackwood's name appeared on the cover.

They turned in to fiction factories, but not in the way you seem to think they did.

Last edited by ZodWallop; 06-06-2020 at 06:07 PM.
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