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Old 07-03-2018, 01:27 PM   #21
CRussel
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The Great Halifax Explosion

I'd like to nominate The Great Halifax Explosion, a book that resonates strongly with Canadians, but also with the people of Boston, who to this day get their giant Christmas tree as a gift from the grateful people of Nova Scotia. Their assistance in the aftermath of the largest and most devastating, non-nuclear, man-made, explosion of all time is remembered to this day.

From Overdrive:
Quote:
NATIONAL BESTSELLER • The riveting, tick-tock account of the largest manmade explosion in history prior to the atomic bomb, and the equally astonishing tales of survival and heroism that emerged from the ashes, from acclaimed New York Times bestselling author John U. Bacon

After steaming out of New York City on December 1, 1917, laden with a staggering three thousand tons of TNT and other explosives, the munitions ship Mont-Blanc fought its way up the Atlantic coast, through waters prowled by enemy U-boats. As it approached the lively port city of Halifax, Mont-Blanc's deadly cargo erupted with the force of 2.9 kilotons of TNT—the most powerful explosion ever visited on a human population, save for HIroshima and Nagasaki. Mont-Blanc was vaporized in one fifteenth of a second; a shockwave leveled the surrounding city. Next came a thirty-five-foot tsunami. Most astounding of all, however, were the incredible tales of survival and heroism that soon emerged from the rubble.

This is the unforgettable story told in John U. Bacon's The Great Halifax Explosion: a ticktock account of fateful decisions that led to doom, the human faces of the blast's 11,000 casualties, and the equally moving individual stories of those who lived and selflessly threw themselves into urgent rescue work that saved thousands.

The shocking scale of the disaster stunned the world, dominating global headlines even amid the calamity of the First World War. Hours after the blast, Boston sent trains and ships filled with doctors, medicine, and money. The explosion would revolutionize pediatric medicine; transform U.S.-Canadian relations; and provide physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer, who studied the Halifax explosion closely when developing the atomic bomb, with history's only real-world case study demonstrating the lethal power of a weapon of mass destruction.

Mesmerizing and inspiring, Bacon's deeply-researched narrative brings to life the tragedy, bravery, and surprising afterlife of one of the most dramatic events of modern times.
This 410 page book is reasonably priced in Canada, FREE in the UK, but a bit pricey everywhere else. It is, however, available on Overdrive. (I have no way to check Hoopla -- sorry.)

AmazonUS: $14.99USD
AmazonCA: $12.74CAD
AmazonAU: $14.99AUD
AmazonUK: £0.00 (FREE)
AudibleUS: 1 credit
Overdrive: (ebook) (audiobook)

This was a defining moment in Canadian history, and showed the wonderful magnanimity of the people of Boston in their rapid and effective response that saved thousands of lives.

Last edited by CRussel; 07-03-2018 at 01:31 PM.
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