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Old 01-12-2020, 09:28 PM   #9
BookCat
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Posts: 2,455
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Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Birmingham UK
Device: Sony e-reader 505, Kindle Paperwhite 2, Kindle Paperwhite 3
I hate the built-in fonts, so since the ability has been available, I've been using custom fonts.

There are several I use frequently, but can't remember where I obtained them. My favourites are, in no order: Caudex, DejaVu Serif E-Ink (good for old gothic books), Lexia Dama, and Merriweather.

I also use some fonts which don't have italics for some books which seem to be almost all italic (Barks and Purrs by Collette is an example) My most used of these are: Poppins and A Simple Kind of Girl. The latter is also useful when reading epistolary books, fiction or non fiction, because it's a clear handwritten font, but you'll lose any italics.
For a very condensed font: Universalis ADF Std and SF Cartoonist Hand, the latter is a handwritten font, but has italics etc.

These were all free fonts.

As you can tell, I make a lot of use of the custom font feature, changing font for each book I read. One of the reasons ereaders are better than deadtreebooks imho.

Last edited by BookCat; 01-12-2020 at 09:34 PM.
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