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Old 04-15-2019, 09:51 PM   #26
Bookworm_Girl
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Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Southwest, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wearever View Post
All true of course, but I kept thinking that Tey wanted to demonstrate how everyone just accepted the history that they were taught. I don't think Grant thought they were stupid but just too accepting. He was a grouchy patient that's for sure.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bookpossum View Post
I think the reason the book was voted to be the best mystery ever, or whatever that title was, is because it was such a different approach, and a very successful one, in getting a lot of people interested not only in the question of “Did he or didn’t he?”, but also in the idea that there are many different versions of history. Also of course the need to go back to original documents, rather than relying on one person’s version of what happened.
I agree with these points. I think that Tey wanted to explore both "how" history is constructed (e.g. myths, propaganda, biases, through the winner's eyes) as well as the "sources." She makes a point of Grant progressing through several different types of sources in his investigation as his interest in solving the mystery grows, i.e. children's history, popular history and scholarly history. Also, the title of the book asserts that time may separate fact from fiction in the future in its reference to Francis Bacon's quote: "Truth is the daughter of time, not of authority."

I am surprised that it is so high at the top of the best mystery ever lists. However, I can appreciate Bookpossum's statement about its unique approach that made history seem more reachable to the average non-scholarly person. When I read this book the first time, it certainly made me more interested in history and prompted me to do more research on the topic.

I too was annoyed by the he just "looks" like a man of integrity, but I suppose the pictures allowed her to have a decent method to introduce Grant's bed-side detecting. I read that Tey taught physical training and worked at a convalescent home as a V.A.D. I wonder if her experience in this area influenced her choice of setting and sparked the idea for this book.
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