View Single Post
Old 06-18-2018, 10:17 AM   #54
Catlady
Grand Sorcerer
Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Catlady ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
Catlady's Avatar
 
Posts: 6,242
Karma: 31105448
Join Date: Oct 2010
Device: Kindle Fire, AGPTek Bluetooth Clip, jetBook Lite
Quote:
Originally Posted by issybird View Post
Then, very early on, I thought Dumas signaled very heavily what we were to make of d'Artagnan, when after his father gave him his horse in trust, committing him to treating the horse well and giving it a comfortable retirement, d'Artagnan no sooner got to Paris then he sold them. But perhaps that was the message; that no father can expect entire fealty from his son, who has to find his own way.
Selling the horse so quickly made me dislike D'Artagnan intensely right away. He both spurned his father's heartfelt gift and blithely discarded a loyal family animal--showing himself to lack honor, respect, and compassion. I could forgive a lot of his youthful braggadocio but I couldn't forgive that. And yet he is supposed be chivalrous and loyal?

He didn't treat women any better than he treated the horse--they were disposable and interchangeable. He used Kitty and he raped Milady. I think his supposed love for Constance was a thing of the moment--she was only of interest because she was a damsel in distress and gave him an excuse to play the gallant musketeer--and his grief over her death was maudlin.
Catlady is offline   Reply With Quote