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Old 07-03-2009, 10:13 AM   #40
Kali Yuga
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Join Date: Mar 2009
Device: Kindle 4 No Touchie
Quote:
Originally Posted by wodin View Post
The big deal is that Amazon.com can and does willfully and with intent trespass into their customers property and remove content which has been duly paid for in order to mitigate their own liability for negligence.
This is incorrect.

By purchasing the Kindle, you've already granted Amazon access to your device. This includes firmware updates and content delivery and management. You've already given them the keys to the house and told them they can put their feet up on the couch.

Nor is Amazon the only company out there with this capability. The iPhone also has a "blacklist" function that can remotely disable applications; subscription music services can deny access to content you've already downloaded, once the service expires.


Quote:
Originally Posted by wodin
I the instance where the customer's card was expired, they still don't have the right to, without permission, delete the files without a court order. They have to seek remedy by legal means.
Again, incorrect.

Access to those documents is a service, not delivery of a tangible good. If you have not paid for the service, you're not entitled to access the service. As far as I can tell, Amazon is well within its legal rights here.


Quote:
Originally Posted by F1Wild
it's not like Amazon has access to anything not related to their own content, do they?
It doesn't look that way. Their database entries for your account (which you can access as the "Reading List" on the website) only tracks Kindle Store purchases. In turn, those documents cannot be managed by Whispernet; e.g. if you have a public domain book on two of your Kindles, the system will not sync both devices to reflect the last page read.
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