Thread: Seriousness Notre Dame de Paris
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Old 04-16-2019, 09:34 AM   #4
OtinG
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I'm torn between two thoughts on the fire.

One is that a majestic architectural and archeological building has been significantly damaged, nearly destroyed. The cathedral was over eight centuries old and the fact that humans in the period could even build it it was amazing given their level of technology at the time. I suspect the intense heat has weakened the stone walls considerably, and I would not be surprised if they have to tear down at least some of the walls.

On the other hand it was a monument built to one up other cities who were building their own "our town's bleep is bigger than yours" monument. It wasn't as much about any god as about pride of one city upping the other cities. It took an estimated 13,000 trees to build the timber sections, and each of those trees was probably 300 to 400 years old. It demanded ridiculous resources in a time when peasants barely subsisted and had rather short life spans. Rather than a church taking care of her flock, they were spending money on monuments. That is sad. To rebuild the cathedral will require a huge tax burden on the people of France, likely far more than the renovators will estimate. Perhaps they should just salvage what they can, and demolish the rest, and maybe build a nice museum where the demolished parts once stood. I would not approve of using that much timber when old growth trees are in such decline, and rebuilding with metal just wouldn't be the same. and here is a news flash, building with stone the way the 12th and 13th century craftsmen did, well that is a lost art.
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