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Old 08-31-2009, 06:37 AM   #2
Sparrow
Wizard
Sparrow ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Sparrow ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Sparrow ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Sparrow ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Sparrow ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Sparrow ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Sparrow ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Sparrow ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Sparrow ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Sparrow ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Sparrow ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
Posts: 4,395
Karma: 1358132
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: UK
Device: Palm TX, CyBook Gen3
Wow, much kudos for taking on this mammoth project - well done!!

The Internet Archive is a good place for finding missing text. For example, in "La Comtesse De Charny", you have some missing text:

"It was with the greatest difficulty that any show of order could be restored and maim***
*** the crowd took advantage***
*** magnificent bass voice:***
***seven pieces, and that em***"

Downloading a PDF of the book from the Internet Archive, (e.g. the one listed at http://ia311221.us.archive.org/1/ite...echarny01duma/) can supply the complete text:

"It was with the greatest difficulty that any show of order
could be restored and maintained; and even then one of
the crowd took advantage of the silence to call out, in a
magnificent bass voice: "I demand that his body be cut
into thirteen pieces, and that one be sent to each canton."
But in spite of the charges against him, and in spite of
the fury of the populace, Besenval was acquitted.
After the trial one of the spectators, apparently a tradesman,
by his costume, as he was passing out with the crowd,
placed his hand upon the shoulder of another man, though
the latter seemed to be a person of much higher rank.
"Well, Doctor Gilbert, what do you think of these two
acquittals?" he asked.
The man thus addressed started violently; but on looking
searchingly at his interlocutor, and recognising the face as
he had recognised the voice, replied, —
''It is to you, and not from you that this question should
come, —you, who know all things, past, present, and
future."
"Well, I say that when two such scoundrels are acquitted,
woe be to the innocent man whose turn shall come next! "
"And why do you think the next man will be innocent,
and yet be punished? "
" Because it is the way of the world to make the good
suffer for the bad."
"Good-bye," said Gilbert, offering Cagliostro his hand,
for he no longer entertained the slightest doubt of the
cynic's identity.
"And why good-bye?"
"Becaiise I have an appointment."
"With whom? Mirabeau, Lafayette, or the queen?"
Gilbert looked at the speaker uneasily.
" You terrify me," he said at last.
" On the contrary, I ought to reassure you."
" And why ? "
" Am I not your devoted friend ? "
" I hope so."
" You may be sure of it ; and if you want a proof of it,
come with me.""
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