Thread: Literary Chess Story by Stefan Zweig
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Old 04-15-2013, 09:44 PM   #14
caleb72
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Interesting Issybird. I didn't really much think about the good vs evil as I was much more interested in looking at the impacts of psychological torture and then seeing them exploited by the champion.

But - you may have answered an earlier question about why so much time was spent giving us the champion's background.

For me, although I could see somewhat of an echo of the Gestapo in the champion, I actually never saw him as evil. In fact, I developed a real appreciation of him in the way he took apart Dr B in that final game. Throughout the story I thought he was going to be taken down a peg, which I guess he was, but to me he proved why he was a champion. He understood that there was more to the game than the moves on the board, something that Dr B never really had a chance to understand.

But your post gives me more of an appreciation of what the author was probably getting at with this story.
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