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Old 07-16-2020, 04:41 PM   #213
shalym
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JSWolf View Post
I've been saying that on MR for a long time now. I agree that making kids read Shakespeare and other really awful books can very easily put kids off on reading. I know I hated Shakespeare because of school and I still do. I will never read anything by him. Other books such as A Canterbury's Tale I found to be awful. However, Hyperion by Dan Simmons I found to be very good and it's very similar. There were other books I really didn't like.

The way a book is taught can influence how it is perceived. I can see disliking a book because of the teacher when otherwise, it might have been enjoyed. School spoils too many books and too many kids don't want to read because of school.

Fortunately, by the time I got to the point in school where books were being destroyed in class or were just awful to start with, I was already enjoying reading for pleasure.
Exactly. It's all in how the books are taught. Both of my kids like Shakespeare because of the way they were taught. My daughter's teacher related Romeo and Juliet to Twilight, and boom--all of the girls (and some of the boys) started reading Shakespeare. My son's teacher gave the students summaries of the stories and allowed them to choose one to read in class as a play, with different students doing different parts. This not only inspired a love of Shakespeare in some students, it also inspired a love of drama in some. Even the students who didn't end up loving Shakespeare, at least didn't hate the lesson.

When I was in High School, we read R&J, then watched the movie. We also watched West Side Story, and discussed the similarities and differences between the two movies and the play. We also learned about Shakespeare the person, and the times that he lived in.

Teachers are so *incredibly* important. They all make a difference in our children's lives, whether it's for the good or bad.

Shari
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