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Old 11-26-2017, 07:49 AM   #8
Steven Lake
Sci-Fi Author
Steven Lake ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lake ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lake ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lake ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lake ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lake ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lake ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lake ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lake ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lake ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Steven Lake ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
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Posts: 1,157
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Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Michigan
Device: PC (Calibre)
I would get out there to some of the author events in your area and in your region and get yourself known by the authors in those areas, as well as the readers. You have to entice both in order to succeed. But as Deskisamess pointed out, what makes your site special from all the other sites out there? Being a free ebook site isn't enough. You have to be one of those sites that people want to go to, not just because you're offering free ebooks. I mean, anyone can do that. They should want to go to your site because you can offer them something nobody else can, or perhaps wants to.

To provide an example of this, I will provide an experience from my own past that relates to this. Years ago I started a Linux tech site called "Raiden's Realm." Even way back then we were one of thousands, and a late comer to the game in general. Yet within a year or so we became one of the top 10 Linux sites on the internet. Why? Because we did something that either nobody else did, or that few wanted to really dive into head first. Namely, we brought in people who knew nothing about Linux, were complete noobs to the operating system, trained them up, and then handed them off to the other sites to take their skills up another notch.

In short we made seasoned Linux users out of complete newbies, which nobody else wanted to do. In fact, that's part of why I started the site, because the old guard was all about "Don't talk to me until you've RTFM'ed." After a while I got tired of seeing newbies get their hopes and dreams dashed to pieces by people shouting RTFM, RTFM constantly, but doing nothing to help them, and then turning around two threads later complaining that they weren't getting fresh blood into the Linux community. Um, duh. Yeah, their arrogance and self styled superiority complexes were driving away the very same fresh blood they were crying for.

So I stepped out and did what on a handful were willing to do, and I focused almost strictly on it instead of having it as an extension of other things I was doing. We were so good at our job of training up newbies that it wasn't long before the big dogs came by kicking in our door wanting a piece of the action. In time they finally realized what we were doing was the right thing to do and began their own newbie training efforts that still remain to this day even though my site itself folded after 3 years, not because we failed, but because I burned out. lol.

Anyhow, long story short, find a niche, find something to make you special, something that either nobody else is doing and people want, or something that very few are doing and people want. Once you find that niche, focus on it and run with it. If you do, you'll go big. If not, you'll shrivel on the vine and nothing will come of it. Anyhow, that's my two cents.
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