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Old 12-10-2016, 10:53 PM   #5
bfisher
Wizard
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bookpossum View Post
And I loved the symmetry of the last paragraph of the story with the ending of the letter from Achille Papin.

It is a beautifully subtle story and I can recommend reading it more than once.
Yes, it was a lovely way to end the story by Philippa echoing her would-be lover Achille Papin.

There is a similiar echo by the older Gen Loewenhielm of Martine's father:

The first time that the young Lt. Loewenhielm sees Martine:
“He was amazed and shocked by the fact that he could find nothing at all to say, and no inspiration in the glass of water before him. ‘Mercy and Truth, dear brethren, have met together,’ said the Dean. ‘Righteousness and Bliss have kissed one another.’”


At the end of the feast, the aged General Loewenhielm, drunk as a lord on the finest wines, and speaking to an equally drunken audience, says:
“‘For mercy and truth have met together, and righteousness and bliss have kissed one another!’
The Brothers and Sisters had not altogether understood the General’s speech, but his collected and inspired face and the sound of well-known and cherished words had seized and moved all hearts. In this way, after thirty-one years, General Loewenhielm succeeded in dominating the conversation at the Dean’s dinner table.”
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