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Old 02-16-2020, 02:08 AM   #14
gmw
cacoethes scribendi
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Catlady, on the thread looking for new theme ideas, you asked of one of my suggestions: "Morality Tales--after Aesop's Fables, what fits?"

I can now give you an answer you will understand: Anne of Green Gables. Every chapter a moral, in some chapters several or reiterations of past morals.


I finished. Nothing unexpected. Like I said in my previous post, I'm not sure exactly where my familiarity comes from. If this was not a club read I'd probably have stopped at around 30%. Not that it was a bad read as such, just that it felt too condescending, too childish, too dated in its mores, for my tastes. I like a lot of kids books, and some authors of strongly moral tales are among my favourites, but this didn't work for me. I liked the elements (many of the characters and the setting), but didn't much like the whole.


I can't be the only one here that cringed when reading about the attention the teacher, Mr Phillips, was paying to his 16yo student Prissy Andrews. Apparently the attention was considered appropriate in those times, and it appears to have worked out acceptably well, at least for the times, but to modern eyes it is quite disturbing (or so it seemed to me).
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