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Old 08-06-2007, 02:19 PM   #5
Steven Lyle Jordan
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The article's okay... remember, it's targeted at the casual Washington Post reader (one that will make it to section F, at any rate), not a technophile, and it does a reasonable job for that audience in that:
  • It uses mainstream lit phrases like Stephen King, Freakonomics and Harry Potter;
  • It compares the reader to the iPod;
  • He points out that e-books are looked down upon by the industry (but without bashing them);
  • He mentions that publishers say they want in (though not why they've been so slow at it);
  • He suggests e-books are good for space-saving, if not budget-saving; and
  • He doesn't scare anyone away with phrases like "incompatible," "DRM," and "operating system."

Points off, IMO, for actually saying "dead-tree". That'll only piss shelf-stuffed book-lovers off and polarize the audience. Other than that, nice and harmless.

Last edited by Steven Lyle Jordan; 08-06-2007 at 02:22 PM.
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