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Old 08-04-2015, 04:15 AM   #15
darryl
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Posts: 2,072
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Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Australia
Device: Kobo Aura H2O, Kindle Oasis, Huwei Ascend Mate 7
I doubt that e-ink devices from Amazon or Kobo are involved with this particular effort, as their e-ink devices already collect information, including of course page read data. Unfortunately it is not entirely clear exactly what data is being collected and how. This is a link to an Electronic Frontiers Foundation paper on the matter from 2012.

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/1...rt-2012-update

A couple of things to note:

1. In relation to many of the questions addressed in their chart, the answer is uncertain.
2. It appears that the software itself has not been analysed. To quote from the paper:

Unfortunately, unpacking the tracking and data-sharing practices of different e-reader platforms is far from simple. It can require reading through stacked license agreements and privacy policies for devices, software platforms, and e-book stores. That in turn can mean reading thousands of words of legalese before you read the first line of a new book.

Legal agreements are useful to determine what can explicitly be done within the agreement, but does not really tell us much about whether it is being done or whether the agreement is being complied with. I suspect some of the answers have been obtained by asking the companies concerned, or by implication.

3. It is three years old. And I doubt the privacy situation has improved in the meantime.

If you want to be certain of preserving your privacy, the only solution is to see that your device never goes online. It is almost certainly okay to connect your device to an online computer via Calibre, but I wouldn't be so sure about closed source products like, say, Kindle4PC or Kobo desktop and the like. Privacy is probably completely out the Window on Android or IOS.
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