Register Guidelines E-Books Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Go Back   MobileRead Forums > E-Book Uploads - Patricia Clark Memorial Library > BBeB/LRF Books

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-08-2009, 01:58 PM   #1
crutledge
eBook FANatic
crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
crutledge's Avatar
 
Posts: 14,898
Karma: 13495654
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Alabama, USA
Device: HP ipac RX5915 Wife's Kindle
Hichens, Robert Smythe: The Green Carnation. V1. 8 Mar 2009

Robert Smythe Hichens (November 14, 1864 – July 20, 1950) was an English journalist and novelist.
Born in Speldhurst in Kent, he was educated at Clifton College, the Royal College of Music, and the London School of Journalism.
He wrote lyrics for music, stories, and collaborated in successful plays. He is best remembered now, perhaps, for his satire on Oscar Wilde, The Green Carnation (1894), his novels that were made into films — The Garden of Allah (pub. 1904) and The Paradine Case (pub. 1933) — and the story "How Love Came to Professor Guildea", which has been frequently anthologized. His novel "Felix" (1902) is an early fictional treatment of hypodermic morphine addiction.
Hichens' classic novel The Green Carnation has been republished as a hardcover volume in 2006.


Excerpt
He slipped a green carnation into his evening coat, fixed it in its place with a pin, and looked at himself in the glass, the long glass that stood near the window of his London bedroom. The summer evening was so bright that he could see his double clearly, even though it was just upon seven o'clock. There he stood in his favourite and most characteristic attitude, with his left knee slightly bent, and his arms hanging at his sides, gazing, as a woman gazes at herself before she starts for a party. The low and continuous murmur of Piccadilly, like the murmur of a flowing tide on a smooth beach, stole to his ears monotonously, and inclined him insensibly to a certain thoughtfulness. Floating through the curtained window the soft lemon light sparkled on the silver backs of the brushes that lay on the toilet-table, on the [Pg 2]dressing-gown of spun silk that hung from a hook behind the door, on the great mass of gloire de Dijon roses, that dreamed in an ivory-white bowl set on the writing-table of ruddy-brown wood. It caught the gilt of the boy's fair hair and turned it into brightest gold, until, despite the white weariness of his face, the pale fretfulness of his eyes, he looked like some angel in a church window designed by Burne-Jones, some angel a little blasé from the injudicious conduct of its life. He frankly admired himself as he watched his reflection, occasionally changing his pose, presenting himself to himself, now full face, now three-quarters face, leaning backward or forward, advancing one foot in its silk stocking and shining shoe, assuming a variety of interesting expressions. In his own opinion he was very beautiful, and he thought it right to appreciate his own qualities of mind and of body. He hated those fantastic creatures who are humble even in their self-communings, cowards who dare not acknowledge even to themselves how exquisite, how delicately fashioned they are. Quite frankly he told other people that he was very wonderful, quite frankly he avowed it to himself. There is a nobility in fearless truthfulness, is there not? and about the magic of his personality he could never be induced to tell a lie.
This work is in the Canadian public domain OR the copyright holder has given specific permission for distribution. It may still be under copyright in some countries. If you live outside Canada, check your country's copyright laws. If the book is under copyright in your country, do not download or redistribute this work.

To report a copyright violation you can contact us here.
Attached Images
 
Attached Files
File Type: lrf The Green Carnation - Hichens_ Robert.lrf (216.9 KB, 140 views)
crutledge is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Romance Hichens, Robert Smythe: The Green Carnation. V1. 8 Mar 2009 crutledge Kindle Books 0 03-08-2009 02:02 PM
Romance Hichens, Robert Smythe: The Green Carnation. V1. 8 Mar 2009 crutledge IMP Books 0 03-08-2009 02:00 PM
Romance Hichens, Robert Smythe: The Green Carnation. V1. 8 Mar 2009 crutledge ePub Books 0 03-08-2009 01:55 PM
Other Fiction Hichens, Robert Smythe: Flames. V1. 4 Mar 2009 crutledge BBeB/LRF Books 0 03-04-2009 04:35 PM
Other Fiction Hichens, Robert Smythe: Flames. V1. 4 Mar 2009 crutledge ePub Books 0 03-04-2009 04:33 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:41 PM.


MobileRead.com is a privately owned, operated and funded community.