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Old 02-01-2013, 01:00 AM   #1
RonPrice
Mr RonPrice
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Posts: 21
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Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: George Town Tasmania Australia
Device: I have 2 ebooks on the internet
ARS LONGA, VITA BREVIS

A person’s life is short, but their creations often endure much longer.-Hippocrates(460 BC-370 BC). He was a Greek physician in Classical Greece, and he is considered one of the most outstanding figures in the history of medicine.

Part 1:

Without the inspiration of curiosity, no one can be an historian, sociologist, psychologist, philosopher, or a serious student of any one of the many humanities and social sciences or any one of the physical, biological and applied sciences. Inspiration, receptivity, and curiosity are indispensable as driving forces, but they are insufficient to bring a budding mind to flower, insufficient to have the mind rise to a higher flight and to stay flying for years and even decades. The individual must make something of these driving forces with other human qualities like: persistence, effort, endurance, patience and a number of other personality factors.

For many of the years of my education from 1949 to 1967, I was involved in an intellectual hurdle-race of alternately preparing and sitting for examinations. Education became for me, during those years from primary school to university, the equivalent of assessment, a continuous form of evaluation and judgement of how I was doing in terms of As, Bs, and Cs, marks out of 100, as well as credits and distinctions.

After those dozen years I did not become a specialist who was intent on knowing more and more about less and less in the form of advanced degrees. It was through some unmerited grace, or perhaps simply incapacity, that prevented me from getting the required high marks to do advanced study in any one field. It was not thanks to any native common sense though that, as an academic pilgrim in my late teens and twenties, from the 1950s to the 1970s, many of the worlds of knowledge slowly came to be of interest to me. No one subject ever stood out above the rest. I started out in life as a generalist and not a specialist, and I remained a generalist into these years of my late adulthood with old-age on the horizon.

[Edited for length - MODERATOR]

When writing and publishing,
when poetizing and essaying,
one casts one’s bread upon the
waters and finds it after many1
days sometimes, as Longfellow
said…“in the heart of a friend,”2
not always, though, not with all
and everyone. If I avoid a study and
literary work which does not die when3
I die, and if I do God’s will by working
for the coming of God’s Kingdom, doing
some little thing knowing that ars longa,4
vita brevis, with my working tempo set by
a psychic chronometer with its hands, its
dynamics: intellect-spiritual-creativity, &
with Andrew Marvell, I will roll all my5
strength and all my sweetness up into one
ball and tear my pleasures with rough strife.

I will go through the iron gates of life, & my
work will then be found after many days & I
will find myself far beyond this least of worlds,
and I will be plunged into many oceans & lands
of light and their gardens of Paradise: oh so
safe, so very safe forevermore, forevermore!

1. Ecclesiastes, xi, I.
2. A poem of American poet and educator Henry Wadsworth Longfellow(1807-1882), The Arrow and the Song.
3. Leonardo da Vinci, The Literary Works of Leonardo da Vinci, editor, J.P. Eichter, 2nd ed., OUP, Oxford, 1929, p. 244, vol.2.
4. Ars longa, vita brevis are the first two lines of a Latin translation of an aphorism by Ancient Greek physician Hippocrates. One of many translations of this aphorism is: “The arts, the creations, of man, can have a long life, but man’s life itself is short.”
5. The English metaphysical poet and politician Andrew Marvell(1621-1678), To His Coy Mistress, II, lines 41-46.

Ron Price 28 & 29/9/’12.
Updated on: 19/11/’12

Last edited by Dr. Drib; 09-03-2014 at 07:42 AM. Reason: to do some editing
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