Register Guidelines E-Books Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Go Back   MobileRead Forums > E-Book Uploads - Patricia Clark Memorial Library > Offline > BBeB/LRF Books (offline)

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-15-2011, 01:04 PM   #1
crutledge
eBook FANatic
crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
crutledge's Avatar
 
Posts: 15,684
Karma: 13575467
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Alabama, USA
Device: HP ipac RX5915 Wife's Kindle
Birmingham, George A: The Northern Iron. V1. 15 Jul 2011

George A. Birmingham was the pen name of James Owen Hannay (16 July 1865 - 2 February 1950), Irish clergyman and prolific novelist.

Excerpt
THE ROAD which connects Portrush with Ballycastle skirts, so far as any road can and dare, the sea coast. Sometimes it is driven inland a mile or so by the impossibility of crossing tracts of sandhills. The mounds and hollows of these dunes are for ever shifting and changing. The loose sand is blown into new fantastic heights and valleys by the winter gales. No road could be built on such insecure foundation. Elsewhere the road shrinks back among the shelterless fields for fear of mighty cliffs by which this northern Antrim coast is defended from the Atlantic. No engineer in the eighteenth century, when the road was made, dared lay his metal close to the Causeway cliffs or the awful precipice of Pleaskin Head. Still, now and then, in places where there are no sandhills and the cliffs are not appalling, the road ventures, for a mile or two, to run within a few hundred yards of the sea, before it is swept, like a cord bent by the wind, further inland. Thus, after passing the ruins of Dunseveric Castle, the traveller sees close beneath him the white limestone rocks and broad yellow stretch of Ballintoy Strand. Here, when northerly gales are blowing, he may, if he is not swept off his feet, cling desperately to his garments and watch the great waves curl their feathered crests as they rush shorewards. He may listen, awestruck, to the ocean's roar of amazement when it batters in vain the hard north coast, the rocks and sand which defy even the strength of the Atlantic.
crutledge is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:55 PM.


MobileRead.com is a privately owned, operated and funded community.