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Old 12-18-2010, 09:56 PM   #1
kveroneau
Edge User
 
Possible way to enable ADB during next update

I know many developers got rather mad about adb access being locked out. Here is how you might be-able to re-enable this access. This has not yet been tested.

Instead of using the OTA update, download the update.zip file from the enTourage support site.

For this part, you may need access to a Linux workstation in order to modify the update files to re-enable ADB access on your unit.

Open update.zip, extract only root.zip. From this file, extract ramdisk.maint.gz.crc, ungzip it.

With the resulting file, loop mount ramdisk.maint to a directory of your choice.

Edit the shell script etc/init.d/edge_wipe.

Change the line:

echo -n 0 > $USERDATA_DST_DIR/property/persist.service.adb.enable
to
echo -n 1 > $USERDATA_DST_DIR/property/persist.service.adb.enable

Put everything back together, and copy the newly patched update.zip to a USB stick and start the update process.

Once your device is updated, simply tell it to "Restore factory settings", to wipe the device with your new settings in place. After the device wipes and reboots, you should now have access to the ADB option under your development settings menu.

There might be other ways to force this to enable as well. I would recommend looking at other options, as this method is sort of risky. Perhaps editing the ramdisk.android instead to manually force this setting.

This does not ROOT your device, it simply re-enabled the removed debugging menu

UPDATE:
The most optimal way to gain debugging access is to edit the file default.prop in the ramdisk.android image.

Just edit: ro.debuggable, and set it to 1, rather than 0. This will only allow debugging access, but will not provide ROOT. To gain ROOT, which is not recommended for normal development of Android apps, edit ro.secure. However, the only purpose of gaining ROOT, is for malicious actions. Also running as ROOT is a security issue, if you install the wrong app for example.

UPDATE 2:
I attempted to do this edit, however it didn't seem to use the new ro.debuggable property. When I went back into my terminal emulator, it was back to ro.debuggable=0. I think there is something in the update.sh file which does a CRC check on the file somehow. I will dig deeper into this later and see if I can force to update with a modified ramdisk image. Perhaps tailoring the update.zip to only modify the ramdisk, thus making it available to developers who need debugging access turned on.

Last edited by kveroneau; 12-18-2010 at 10:42 PM.
 
Old 12-19-2010, 02:12 AM   #2
mrspaceman
Edge User
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kveroneau View Post
However, the only purpose of gaining ROOT, is for malicious actions.
that's a rather broad brush stroke.

do you believe that enabling debugging on the edge is malicious?

Do you really think that there are only malicious reasons for gaining root access?
If you really do believe that then I suggest that you do some research first.

andy.

(p.s. I guess you don't like me on Moral grounds as I have root access on my HTC Hero, my WII and my eDGe)
 
Old 12-19-2010, 06:45 AM   #3
Snepscheut
Edge User
 
Hello Andy (mrspaceman)

First, I second you point of view!

Second, nice to see your a hero user too. Dare I ask what rom you'r using?

Greetings Jos.
 
Old 12-19-2010, 07:02 AM   #4
mrspaceman
Edge User
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snepscheut View Post
Hello Andy (mrspaceman)

First, I second you point of view!

Second, nice to see your a hero user too. Dare I ask what rom you'r using?

Greetings Jos.
I'm currently running VillainROM 1.6. I've been meaning to try 1.7 and cyanogen, but not found the time.

andy.
 
Old 12-19-2010, 07:08 AM   #5
Snepscheut
Edge User
 
Good choice! I'm running 1.7 witch I like very well.

Jos.
 
Old 12-19-2010, 08:07 AM   #6
Gunnerp245
Edge User
 
Arrow

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrspaceman View Post
that's a rather broad brush stroke.
@mrspaceman

I believe adventurous people like yourself, robot, and others is what will make the eDGe a power device.
Certainly root access can be used incorrectly, maybe the original OP would like access to "his" computer c: directory to be off limits too.?
 
Old 12-19-2010, 11:14 AM   #7
skapsal
Edge User
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrspaceman View Post
(p.s. I guess you don't like me on Moral grounds as I have root access on my HTC Hero, my WII and my eDGe)
It makes me like you more.
 
Old 12-19-2010, 01:15 PM   #8
kveroneau
Edge User
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrspaceman View Post
do you believe that enabling debugging on the edge is malicious?
I never said anything about debugging being used for malicious actions, as it does give you a remote debugging terminal as a normal user, just as your application would run on the device normally. With debugging enabled, this enables ADB access, so that you can install packages in seconds on the device. Rather than copying to an SD, or over WiFi. To install packages over the ADB channel, one does not require ROOT permissions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrspaceman View Post
Do you really think that there are only malicious reasons for gaining root access?
Unless your developing a driver or some low-level application on the device, such as a special service. Your application should not require ROOT permissions to run. For normal eDGe application development, you and your application should only require debugging access via ADB/GDB in Eclipse. Unlike traditional Linux machines, to install new packages, you do not require ROOT permissions. Think along the side of make install, although one could just change the PREFIX and install the binaries in their home directory...

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrspaceman View Post
If you really do believe that then I suggest that you do some research first.
I have been using Linux for many years, and frown upon Microsoft for running their XP machines as Administrator from first install. On my Linux machine, I know when I need to use su, and when my applications should not require them. For the most part, I only need root to use cryptsetup, make install, and installing packages via the package manager. My system does not even have sudo installed, due to the security paranoia I have with my data. If for some reason Android does require ROOT for developers, please include a link here, as I'm rather curious on why it would require such permissions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrspaceman View Post
(p.s. I guess you don't like me on Moral grounds as I have root access on my HTC Hero, my WII and my eDGe)
My LG Eve is only rooted, because LG does not release their Android updates as swiftly as the open source community. Who doesn't like being stuck in the past with a really old Android release that can do nothing but be a paper holder. Mind you, the phone does not run as root from boot, the ROM came with a root whitelist application, so unless I authorize the app, I'm safe for the most part. Android Spyware is all I have to worry about.

I do not know anybody who uses a modded Wii for legit purposes. If your a proud Wii homebrew developer, that's great to hear. I originally bought a PS3, because it supported a fully explorable Linux dual-boot system. This way I could compile and test applications with the new Cell processor, it was much fun. Unfortunately, the homebrew community got a little too overwhelming for Sony, and they blocked out the Linux dual-boot. The moral of this story, is basically watch which devices you root, hack, mod, etc... It can have a bigger impact than you might first imagine. Because of the PS3 hacker community, I lost easy, affordable access to a Cell processor chip.
 
Old 12-19-2010, 01:24 PM   #9
kveroneau
Edge User
 
Answered my own question:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2...-rooted-device

According to this source:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Schubert
You don't need root to develop for Android.

The easiest setup is to run Eclipse with the Android Development Tools installed. Then, you can debug your application in the emulator, or register your phone with the SDK and debug directly on your phone. The only thing you need to do on your phone is check the development mode under Settings -> Applications

I can understand the allure of having a rooted device, but I can't really see a reason for changing the bootloader or os binaries. You can, however, change most of the default applications (including the Home application) with other applications available on the Market. For instance, OpenHome is about $5 and allows you to replace the home app, add themes, and replace many of the core apps (e.g. clock).
http://android-dls.com/wiki/index.php?title=Why_Root

From reading on this Wiki about Why Root, there is really nothing there that appeals to developers who wish to deploy their apps to normal end-users. All you need is debugging enabled on your Android device to reach this Development menu, which I do not understand why enTourage has disabled this setting, all it does it give on-device debugging via Eclipse.

http://developer.android.com/guide/d...ng/device.html

Information from the Android Developer website(I would think a really great source), it says nothing about ROOT, only about enabling USB Debugging in the Development menu. Of which, unfortunately the eDGe currently has disabled. This will hopefully change when they release their SDK into the Wild.

Last edited by kveroneau; 12-19-2010 at 01:36 PM. Reason: Added wiki link for Why_Root, and link to creditable source on Android.com
 
Old 12-19-2010, 01:36 PM   #10
Chubulor
Edge User
 
Quote:
frown upon Microsoft for running their XP machines as Administrator from first install.
My two main computers at home and office both run XP, and I use the Administrator account maybe once every six months. It's not hard to create a Limited user upon install.
 
Old 12-19-2010, 01:39 PM   #11
mrspaceman
Edge User
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kveroneau View Post
However, the only purpose of gaining ROOT, is for malicious actions.
kveroneau, can I ask why you made the above statement if you understand that there can be legitimate reasons for gaining ROOT?
 
Old 12-19-2010, 01:55 PM   #12
kveroneau
Edge User
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chubulor View Post
My two main computers at home and office both run XP, and I use the Administrator account maybe once every six months. It's not hard to create a Limited user upon install.
I agree, but most end-users do not do this, unfortunately. I was quite happy when Microsoft changed this in Vista and 7, creating a limited user account upon installation. Although they could have done a tad better with the UAC prompts which are criticized all around the net. But in reality, it was only being criticized as people were not used to it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrspaceman View Post
kveroneau, can I ask why you made the above statement if you understand that there can be legitimate reasons for gaining ROOT?
Truthfully, that is mainly what I hear it being used for in the Android community. There are more press releases of negativity towards it, than positive feedback of it. I know it's sad that cell phone carriers disable Tethering, but it is part of that legal contract you sign with the data plan. There are other features which Android has, but have been disabled by manufacturers or cell phone carriers. What they disable is more than likely in your legally bound contract you signed. Circumventing this, is non-legitimate use of the device, and is illegal by the bounding contract signed by you and the cell phone carrier. Leaving this feature unlocked, and say the customer accidentally clicks on tethering. The carrier finds out somehow, and brings the customer to court by breach of contract. This would result in too many court cases, so disabling the feature is easiest to keep the customer abiding the signed contract.

I admit, it's a great to have when discovering the phone internals and how everything works. Or perhaps developing a custom firmware, in which the main developers have been slow. There are still many phones out there using stone age Android 1.5. My phone was one of them. Rooting my device gave me the ability to upgrade to a more recent Android release, something which my phone manufacturer was not willing to do. You do need root access to flash a new recovery image on a device to enable flashing of the Android system via fastboot. Although, technically flashing a ROM not provided by the manufacturer is deemed non-legitimate by the manufacturer. Also, in the agreement that comes with most cell phones(not including the eDGe, I think...), it states that modifying any system files can void your warranty. Editing files under specific locked android directories, are not put back after one does a factory reset, the changes persist. To the cell phone manufacturer editing these locked down directories is non-legitimate use.

An interesting idea, say in the future household appliances begin running networked software, they can be controlled and monitored anywhere in the household. This is most definitely going to happen, as being seen with the "Windows house" Bill Gates displayed a few years back. Now, say your microwave runs Android. The manufacturer says not to modify any of the system files and leave the Android firmware as it. A user ends up rooting their microwave and changing some system files around to hopefully optimize it. Little did the user know, he/she edited a crucial setting for power output. The next time, they or a family member go and use the microwave, it ends up causing a power surge and you can only guess what happens next.

I certainly hope that these types of devices will never be-able to run such software and just run via PIC chips. I could just see the chaos of a rooted Android microwave in our world. Husband hates wife, husbands roots and hacks microwave, husband goes out for the evening. Husband calls home to wife, "Can you put such such in the microwave? I'll be home soon." Wife turns on microwave and gets baked.

There is always a reason the manufacturer does not want the end-user tinkering with their firmware, and that's why most of them deem modifying it, non-legitimate. If you want to root your phone or eDGe, by all means. However, if anything should go wrong, just don't cry to the manufacturer.

Last edited by kveroneau; 12-19-2010 at 02:35 PM. Reason: added response to mrspaceman
 
Old 12-19-2010, 03:04 PM   #13
mrspaceman
Edge User
 
well at least your making me laugh now

you say that all ROOT'ing is malicious and then you admit to rooting devices!
 
Old 12-20-2010, 02:33 AM   #14
kveroneau
Edge User
 
The updated ROMs for my device come pre-rooted, from the OpenEtna project. I think that's how it's spelt. I just take the updates as they are provided. In reality, I could just fork away more money and buy a new device with updated software, like Android 2.1. But since my carrier only let's me update my device on discount within the last year my contract(in order to get me to renew), I'm stuck with an outdated device, or paying a premuim for a brand new top of the line device. I could go used, but I don't trust used devices as much(and they also lack a warranty).

Much like a Desktop PC, the Operating system of most mobile devices can be upgraded. Since LG has been neglecting this, my only choice is to use ROMs compiled by the community with support for my device built-in. This is both the cheaper route, as well as the easiest in some cases. I currently have Android 1.6, tempted on upgrading it to 2.2, which just came out recently for the device. The only way for me to take advantage of these upgrades(which LG has neglected), is to have my phone rooted to use fastboot in order to flash the new NAND images. This is the only thing I use ROOT for, since LG does not support the device anymore, and I bought the device from a friend to replace a Nokia E71 phone I had. If I mess with the phone, and break it, I don't really have a warranty to worry about, and I'm not using it on my carriers network against terms of my contract. I have a seperate Internet key, thus replacing the tethering issue. Which doesn't make sense to me... Like come-on, they say I cannot tether on my phone, but then I can use an Internet key which can surpass the bandwidth that any tether can provide. Since they are both SIM devices, I just swap my SIM and use the data plan from my phone on my laptop via the Internet key. Well, I guess lawyers are writing these contracts, not techies.

I do try to stay on the right of the law in as many cases as possible. I only sway if there is a justification which may go through well in court. For the most part, my carrier should not be-able to detect a device with a different firmware. My device was given to me from my friend, SIM unlocked. So, my carrier really has zero knowledge about the device. As long as I don't do anything to trigger something on their end, it's all good. As for LG, they don't actively monitor their devices for firmware hacks, all they would do is void a warranty, which I don't even have. Warranties are apparently non-transferable, and the device is pretty dated. It's like the IRS stuff, you always want to keep your audits clean, just in case something comes around to get you. You never know when that cell phone carrier may just pull a monitoring log and see something that shouldn't be. Google may also trigger the same thing with their Market in the future to protect developers. Say, the Google Market can detect when a phone is rooted and refuse to execute any DRM protected apps. A special kernel module could be built for this purpose, and it does not need to be GPL'd. Yes, Google can definately make a DRM kernel module non-GPL. It taints the kernel, but under Linux these days, many modules do this, such as nvidia's GPU kernel driver, or VMWare's kernel driver. I can see this happening in Android's near future. A kernel module could also prevent root, for example. If you have seen the advances in NSA's SELinux kernel, it displays potential on what can be controlled from a mere kernel module, its powerful stuff. Although like most hackable devices, a simple buffer overflow can usually assist in gaining access(although I think SELinux has a protection against this...).

Hmm, I am actually tempted on developing a kernel module to prevent SU from working. This would be a very interesting project to see if it can be done. Since the source code for SU exists, I just need to see what system calls it uses and make the module circumvent them. Although it will break applications across the board, if not done right. I'm sure this system call is used for many applications(PAM, login, sudo, glibc, etc...), mainly to log the user in, by changing the UID. However, if the kernel module just proxied the system call, and say no allowing any UID above 1000 to use it, but proxying others through. This may also break SUID permissions as well, but not many apps use SUID for everyday applications. Apache uses it for PHP user switching, so that the scripts run as the user it was written by. But for mobile devices, it appears to be less common.
 
Old 12-20-2010, 02:22 PM   #15
mrspaceman
Edge User
 
OMG; google are malicious !!!
 
 

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