View Single Post
Old 09-17-2007, 09:32 PM   #1
Patricia
Reader
Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Patricia ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
Patricia's Avatar
 
Posts: 11,520
Karma: 2199070
Join Date: May 2007
Location: South Wales, UK
Device: Sony PRS-500, PRS-505, Asus EEEpc 4G
James, William: The Varieties of Religious Experience, v1, 18 Sept 2007.

William James: The Varieties of Religious Experience: A Study in Human Nature.
Being the Gifford Lectures on Natural Religion Delivered at Edinburgh in 1901-1902

I was prompted to tackle this for several reasons.
1. Occasionally I use it for teaching, and enjoy reading it.
2. Some people here are interested in mysticism, and James has an interesting chapter on this topic.
3. Strether has been regaling us with the novels of William James’s younger brother, Henry, which reminded me of this book. Both brothers share a desire to describe complex and elusive emotions.

I have added a TOC, reformatted, and removed some spelling errors. There are 362 notes in the text. Both PG and the other online sources have left them at the end of the adjacent paragraph. I have done the same because I couldn’t face the thought of moving and hyperlinking them all.


From Wikipedia:
James did important work in philosophy of religion. In his Gifford Lectures at the University of Edinburgh he provided a wide-ranging account of The Varieties of Religious Experience (1902) and interpreted them according to his pragmatic leanings. Some of the important claims he makes in this regard:
• Religious genius (experience) should be the primary topic in the study of religion, rather than religious institutions—since institutions are merely the social descendant of genius.
• The intense, even pathological varieties of experience (religious or otherwise) should be sought by psychologists, because they represent the closest thing to a microscope of the mind—that is, they show us in drastically enlarged form the normal processes of things.
• In order to usefully interpret the realm of common, shared experience and history, we must each make certain "over-beliefs" in things which, while they cannot be proven on the basis of experience, help us to live fuller and better lives.
The investigation of mystical experience was constant throughout the life of James, leading him to experiment with chloral hydrate (1870), amyl nitrite (1875), nitrous oxide (1882), and even peyote (1896). James claimed that it was only when he was under the influence of nitrous oxide that he was able to understand Hegel. He concluded that while the revelations of the mystic hold true, they hold true only for the mystic; for others, they are certainly ideas to be considered, but can hold no claim to truth without personal experience of such.
This work is in the Canadian public domain OR the copyright holder has given specific permission for distribution. It may still be under copyright in some countries. If you live outside Canada, check your country's copyright laws. If the book is under copyright in your country, do not download or redistribute this work.

To report a copyright violation you can contact us here.
Attached Files
File Type: lrf The Varieties of Religious Experience.lrf (568.9 KB, 526 views)
Patricia is offline   Reply With Quote