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Old 04-28-2010, 09:02 PM   #7
K-Thom
Wizard
K-Thom ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.K-Thom ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.K-Thom ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.K-Thom ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.K-Thom ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.K-Thom ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.K-Thom ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.K-Thom ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.K-Thom ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.K-Thom ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.K-Thom ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
Posts: 3,302
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Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Berlin, Germany
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Being a creator in the digital world is somewhat different from being one in the material world.

Nowadays it's quite easy and affordable to be digitally creative. In th material world you need ressources - to produce a movie, a CD, a book. This means you have to invest. Or convince people to invest. In you. Then you need to convince a distributor. Or you're doing the Robert Crumb stunt who sold his first comic books hand-stapled on the streets of San Francisco.

Which brings us to the integral part: devotion.

Believe me, I won't come up with "If you believe in your work, you'll eventually have success". That's nonsense. But if you're not devoted to your work, you won't ever have any chance for success.
And this is true for Indie as for mainstream, for digital as for material.

Next comics example: Dave Sim and Cerebus. Started as a funny animal Indie comics in the 1970s. Then he came up with the silly notion of publishing 300 issues, month after moth to complete a single storyline of 6000 pages. Unsurpassed until today. From funny animal to cult. Devotion. To his work, to his audience. Besides, he made quite a living ...
The reaction of Paul Levitz, then-director at DC Comics: "Self-publishing is good ... - for Dave Sim."

Never ask those who already direct the market. To them you're either an obscurity or a threat.
When I started "Talon", my jungle adventure series in 2002 as free eBooks, I was hoping for some 500 downloads. I wrote 18 episodes, one every other week, stopped for a short time, wrote another 7 episodes. Downloads up to now? Something above 250.000.
I stopped writing the (unfinished) series some years back. But when I lost my devotion, I lost the attention of my audience (except for some diehard fans, but they seem to remain loyal, after all those years). Though I still have a small press-publisher at hand who is willing to publish the series in print (he called last week again and asked ...). Why? Because he liked the idea of a modern jungle adventure series which is definitely way off mainstream.

You never know what exactly it is that grabs the attention of one "within" the market. Just make sure you'll stay around long enough to be noticed by someone. Even it means standing on the streets and selling photocopied issues to passers-by. Like Robert Crumb.

Last edited by K-Thom; 04-28-2010 at 09:08 PM.
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