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Old 04-13-2010, 02:34 PM   #104
Steven Lyle Jordan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemurion View Post
I'm also taking exception to the undertone I've got from some of the posters in this thread that anyone who claims to get eyestrain from a backlit LCD is simply doing it wrong. It's too reminiscent of a "blame the victim" mentality and I don't care for it.
It's true, and we're trying to avoid that undertone (I am especially). Thing is, there is no proof outside of anecdotal evidence that there is any difference between reflective and transmissive light, as many posters continue to insist, and professional medical statements to the effect that there is no difference to the eye between equal amounts of light either transmitted or reflected.

Some of us are trying very hard to emphasize that everyone's eyes are different... nevertheless, it's hard to avoid that sort of tone you mention. I mean, I doubt it would help if we took the tone that some people's eyes are just deficient compared to others. But without concrete evidence, we can't say one media is deficient compared to the others, either.

So how do we address a clear difference in how one person's eyes react to viewing media versus another person's eyes, when there is no scientific proof that one media is superior or inferior to the other?

All we can do is state which media work well for ourselves, and avoid making blanket statements about the quality or superiority/inferiority of the media.
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