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Old 04-07-2010, 09:08 PM   #46
MikeRo
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Posts: 99
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Join Date: Oct 2009
Device: Sony PRS-300, Kindle 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by schmolch View Post
Eye-strain is not caused by the fact that a screen is backlit.
A Paper-Book shines light into your eyes the same way, by reflection.

Eye-Strain is caused by:
- too much brightness. Your screen should not be much brighter than your Surroundings.
- other bright Light-Sources in your viewing area. Bright Lights should be above you or behind you and shine straight down only. Look at Office-Lights, they have Grid-Reflectors for this reason.
- Wrong Distance to monitor. If you have read alot of Books, your eyes might have permanently adjusted to this small Distance for reading (thus the eye-glasses to correct this) and reading at a bigger distance requires eye-muscle work and those get tired quickly causing the sensation of eye-strain.

Eye-strain is always a muscle-issue, there is nothing else in your eyes that could cause this sensation.

I had huge eye-strain issues myself and even gave up Desktop-PCs completely (Laptops were fine) until i noticed the importance of all these 3 Factors.
You missed one physiological factor from the article in the Times referenced in item #9:

Quote:
For example, the ergonomics of reading screens and the lack of blinking when we stare at them play a big role in eye fatigue. “The current problem with reading on screens is that we need to adjust our bodies to our computer screens, rather than the screens adjusting to us,” Dr. Meredith said.
Why should I adjust my body to reading on LCD screens when there are other alternatives?

If reading on LCD screens works for you, great. Do not assume that those of us who prefer reading on other non-lit devices are unaware of how to properly set up LCD screens.

As an aside, I wish monitor manufacturers would go back to including brightness and contrast knobs on their monitors (as opposed to tapping through several on-screen menus) - it would be far easier to adjust your monitor to changing light conditions.
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