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Old 02-04-2010, 04:23 PM   #18
MrBlueSky
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Posts: 53
Karma: 400693
Join Date: Jan 2010
Device: Sony 600
Your Fair Right - assert it or lose it!

Fugazied (post 11)

I donít think the real purpose of DRM protection is to circumscribe the activities of (1%) people who file-share.

Its more than likely that the monopoly content hoarders have designed their DRM systems specifically to deny the other 99% their fair use rights (as the other 1% continue to enjoy unscathed).

After all, forcing a proportion of 99% of people to purchase multiple copies of protected files (or their relatives/friends to do so) is exponentially more profitable to them than any amount revenue allegedly Ďlostí to file-sharing.


By definition, if you pay the same price (or higher) for a digital edition as you do for a hardback/paperback copy (Macmillan, are you listening), then you have purchased the same First Sale rights on the former as already exist for the latter (irrespective of what any EULA/licence nonsense they may try to impose).

Once purchased, simply strip the DRM and sell or give away (share) as your inclination takes you (assert your fair use rights) ó just as you have the right to do with your physical edition purchases.


Isn't life simple when you donít have to worry?
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