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Old 01-11-2010, 06:04 AM   #3
LDBoblo
Wizard
LDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcover
 
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Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Asia
Device: Kindle 3 WiFi, Sony PRS-505
I'd love to have a dedicated ebook reader with a Liquavista screen. I have absolutely no need for video, but I do have a need to view things quickly, which present electrophoretic screens like E-Ink cannot do. There are many potential benefits of a high-rate-capable display that do not amount to video playback.

E-Ink's current manifestation probably deserves to be obsolesced with things that perform more quickly and with better viewing quality. However, one should not assume E-Ink to be equal to dedicated devices, unless E-Ink were significantly cheaper than competing e-paper technologies, which I don't expect to be the case.

For competent video playback, there's more than simply a screen to be concerned with, and cumulative hardware and software costs could be a factor in device price. If such is the case, then dedicated readers with superior screens should still be able to replace E-Ink devices assuming prices are kept similar (or lower).
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