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Old 12-26-2009, 10:35 PM   #7
rogue_ronin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Valloric View Post
All of these will not be implemented in Sigil since there's no way to export them to epub [see EDIT]. The spec doesn't support them.

And no, I don't like the idea of custom meta elements. EDIT: I still don't like this idea... but on further reflection I believe it may be wise to allow pass-through of unsupported <meta> elements and their attributes.

So if there's a meta element in an OPF or HTML that Sigil can't map to something epub-specific, it should be stored as such and then exported in the final epub's OPF without harm.
I think that I've been thinking about how does an ePub file fit into a collection of such files, and how might other software use the metadata in ways that are unnecessary to the simple (!) production of an individual ebook.

Sigil doesn't need to support that metadata; it's irrelevant. But is there a way to encode that extra metadata in a way that is consistent with the DC terms? The ePub spec uses both <dc:term> and <opf:term> is there another set of terms that could be used to code these other metadata?

What Kevin wrote also seems to suggest that there are many "common" non-spec meta elements that can be mapped to the spec. It seems to me that something like using the relation tag for series is within the spec (at least as given in 2003).

I'm both thinking "out loud" here about how to encode the other metadata, and trying to nail down what code/terms exactly Sigil is currently supporting because it seems to be the first application that is taking such metadata in XHTML into account.

An explicit list of such terms would be useful to those of us who encode primarily in XHTML first and then convert. At some point, converters like Calibre may be able to find it too.

m a r

ps: Yesterday, for example, I imported 181 Doc Savage HTML files into Calibre as an experiment. It didn't even search the <title> tag to find the title. Just took the title from the file name. Now there may be a setting for that, I'll have to look again, but it seems obvious to me to look for metadata when importing HTML.
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