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Old 05-15-2007, 10:26 PM   #1
Dr. Drib
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Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: San Borja (Lima), Peru
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Machen, Arthur: The Three Imposters. v2. 15 May 07

NOTE: This is VERSION 2 - but it doesn't say that on the upload. I fixed about 20 screens of screwed-up lines, so it should read much better. You should delete your earlier version - especially if you love this "novel" - and replace it with this one.

One of the most influential books of horror ever written.

From one source: "The Three Impostors is an episodic novel by British horror fiction writer Arthur Machen, first published in 1895 in the Bodley Head's Keynote Series. Its importance was recognized in its later revival in paperback by Ballantine Books as the forty-eighth volume of the celebrated Ballantine Adult Fantasy series in June 1972."

And more: Two of the novel's inset tales, "The Novel of the Black Seal" and "The Novel of the White Powder", have been cited as major influences on the work of H. P. Lovecraft. In his survey Supernatural Horror in Literature, Lovecraft suggested that these stories "perhaps represent the highwater mark of Machen's skill as a terror-weaver."

More: "The Novel of the Black Seal" has been cited as a model for some of Lovecraft's best-known stories: "The Call of Cthulhu",[2] "The Dunwich Horror",[3] and "The Whisperer in Darkness".[4] "The Novel of the White Powder", which Lovecraft said "approaches the absolute culmination of loathsome fright",[5] is pointed to as an inspiration for Lovecraft's stories of bodily disintegration, such as "Cool Air" and "The Colour Out of Space".

If you like your horror suble and literate, then you should love this book.

I hope you enjoy it.

Please: If you find errors, let me know and I'll do my best to correct them.

NOTE: This is a somewhat lonely business putting these together, but it sure is fun.

Last edited by Dr. Drib; 05-23-2008 at 10:29 AM. Reason: version 2 - Added Prefix
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