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Old 09-20-2009, 02:07 AM   #11
LDBoblo
Wizard
LDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcoverLDBoblo exercises by bench pressing the entire Harry Potter series in hardcover
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpiderMatt View Post
If they're illiterate then they obviously have something to gain by reading children's books. It's more challenging for them than those of us who have been reading our entire lives. Similarly, reading a Spanish children's book is challenging for me and a worthwhile endeavor to improve my Spanish skills.
That's largely my point. Most such people aren't intellectually inferior really (some are quite a bit more intelligent and up on society than some of the PhD grads I know). I think the spirit of Mr. Twain's quote, at least in the world that I know and not necessarily his world, is that people should not be satisfied with the common, and should aspire to see and do and know great things. The literate often take their literacy for granted. In such cases, complacency is stagnation.
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