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Old 07-10-2009, 07:01 AM   #11
pdurrant
The Grand Mouse
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It's very complicated taking about copyright lengths in hypothetical cases unless you specify very clearly when the hypothetical case takes place.

A work published today, one year after an author dies will have 69 years copyright.

Before the 1988 act, copyright in the UK was only lifetime+50 anyway, so the 50 years after publication was always longer.

A work published today, 71 years after the author's death won't come out of copyright until 2040.

a work published in 2040, 71 years after the author's death will be instantly in the public domain - indeed, an unpublished work 71 years after the author's death will be in the public domain. Unless, of course, the law is changed in the next 31 years!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jellby View Post
I think it would be more logical to have a combination of both rules. Does anyone know how it is in Canada or the rest of the European Union?
PLEASE don't suggest extending copyright any more! And since "publication" now is getting harder to pin down, it seems a less useful way of deciding when something should be covered by copyright.
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