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Old 07-10-2009, 05:06 AM   #8
Jellby
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Location: Spaniard in Sweden
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HarryT View Post
To answer the original poster's question, in the UK at least, a posthumous work has copyright protection for 50 years from the end of the year of its initial publication. The date of the author's death is not relevent in this circumstance.
So, a work published one year after the author's death would be public domain 50 years afterwards, even though the author died less than 70 years before?

Quote:
Originally Posted by pdurrant View Post
unpublished works only have copyright for lifetime+70 years. But there is a fifty year transition period.
So, a work published 71 years after the author's death would be instantly public domain?

I think it would be more logical to have a combination of both rules. Does anyone know how it is in Canada or the rest of the European Union?

P.S. When I said it was "easy" in the US, I meant that posthumous works were treated just the same as regular lifetime works. I am aware it is actually far from "easy"
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