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Old 06-07-2009, 08:24 PM   #60
mklynds
That guy, no not that guy
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Join Date: May 2009
Location: Alberta, Canada
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I will second Oryx & Crake. I will also add that I found the book to be good, the content can be a little "raw" shall we say. Being a Canadian I had to read Atwood through out school and found this to be the best book of hers that I have read. It is definitely post apocalyptic and very very original. If you don't have an overly sensitive soul I would recommend it but as it does contain content some may find hard to swallow. Take that as a WARNING as you will.

I would also like to throw out another post apocalyptic read that all readers of the genre are sure to love. S.M. Sterling's Dies The Fire is an absolute must read in the post apocalyptic genre. I didn't see anyone else recommend this, but if it has been recommended consider this my second. And because it deserves better explanation than I have time for....

From Booklist
For survivors of a mysterious event that caused electricity, internal combustion engines, and gunpowder to fail, the Pacific Northwest furnishes enough land to support subsistence existence in a future that belongs not to today's rifle-toting survivalists but to people who know older ways. Musician Juniper takes refuge on her family's land with a growing group of friends that becomes "Clan MacKenzie." Reenactors know useful things (see Jenny Thompson's War Games [BKL Je 1&15 04]), such as how to build log houses and craft bows for hunting. Meanwhile, Mike Havel, a pilot who was flying when the Change happened, and his passengers, having survived crashing in a frigid lake, gather followers, too. Thanks to a former Society for Creative Anachronism (a real organization of eclectic reenactors) fencer, and after hard work and the accident that gives their group the name "Bearkillers," they have the knowledge to sell their protective services. There are villains, too, such as a medieval history professor who starts a feudal revival, in Stirling's intriguing what-if about modern humans denied their treasured conveniences. Regina Schroeder
Copyright American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

I hope these recommendations give someone a good read as so many of your recommendations are giving me good reading material.
Mike
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