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Old 05-08-2009, 12:39 PM   #5
jharker
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Posts: 345
Karma: 3473
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Brooklyn, NY, USA
Device: iRex iLiad v1, Blackberry Tour, Kindle DX, iPad.
I love the new Kindle DX, but I'm not sure whether the envisioned e-textbook application will really catch on. I agree that the biggest obstacle is the typical usage pattern. Alphapheemail, you're totally right, everyone wants to be able to highlight or mark up the book, or dog-ear a page, etc. Plus (from the article):
Quote:
"It didn't lend itself to the way students actually study," said Paul Klute, who runs the university's e-textbook project. "The students skip around, they look for key words, they look for pictures or charts or graphs. They wanted to be able to jump to Page 29 without having to push a button 29 times."
I completely agree.

Still, the cost factor may become relevant as well. Looking at a small selection of >$50 physics textbooks on Amazon, the typical Kindle version is 25%-60% cheaper than the hardcover version. At those rates, and given the price of most science textbooks, even the Kindle DX would pay for itself in just a couple of semesters. One book was $740 in hardback and only $207 for the Kindle. Heck, the Kindle pays for itself with that book alone.
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