View Single Post
Old 02-14-2009, 12:30 PM   #1
crutledge
eBook FANatic
crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.crutledge ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
crutledge's Avatar
 
Posts: 15,945
Karma: 13575467
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Alabama, USA
Device: HP ipac RX5915 Wife's Kindle
MacGrath, Harold: A Splendid Hazard. V1. 14 Feb 2009

Harold MacGrath (September 4, 1871 - October 30, 1932) was a bestselling American novelist, short story writer, and screenwriter.
Also known occasionally as Harold McGrath, he was born in Syracuse, New York. As a young man, he worked as a reporter and columnist on the Syracuse Herald newspaper until the late 1890s when he published his first novel, a romance titled "Arms and the Woman." According to the New York Times, his next book, "The Puppet Crown," was the No.7 bestselling book in the United States for all of 1901. From that point on, MacGrath never looked back, writing novels for the mass market about love, adventure, mystery, spies, and the like at an average rate of more than one a year. He would have three more of his books that were among the top ten bestselling books of the year. At the same time, he penned a number of short stories for major American magazines such as The Saturday Evening Post, Ladies Home Journal, and Red Book magazine. Several of MacGrath's novels were serialized in these magazines and contributing to them was something he would continue to do until his death in 1932.

Excerpt
A blurring rain fell upon Paris that day; a rain so fine and cold that it penetrated the soles of menís shoes and their hearts alike, a dispiriting drizzle through which the pale, acrid smoke of innumerable wood fires faltered upward from the clustering chimney-pots, only to be rent into fragments and beaten down upon the glistening tiles of the mansard roofs. The wide asphalts reflected the horses and carriages and trains and pedestrians in forms grotesque, zigzagging, flitting, amusing, like a shadow-play upon a wrinkled, wind-blown curtain. The sixteenth of June. To Fitzgerald there was something electric in the date, a tingle of that ecstasy which frequently comes into the blood of a man to whom the romance of a great battle is more than its history or its effect upon the destinies of human beings. Many years before, this date had marked the end to a certain hundred days, the eclipse of a sun more dazzling than Rome, in the heyday of her august Caesars, had ever known: Waterloo. A little corporal of artillery; from a cocked hat to a crown, from Corsica to St. Helena: Napoleon.
This work is assumed to be in the Life+70 public domain OR the copyright holder has given specific permission for distribution. Copyright laws differ throughout the world, and it may still be under copyright in some countries. Before downloading, please check your country's copyright laws. If the book is under copyright in your country, do not download or redistribute this work..

To report a copyright violation you can contact us here.
Attached Images
 
Attached Files
File Type: lrf A Splendid Hazard - MacGrath_ Harold.lrf (272.7 KB, 233 views)
crutledge is online now   Reply With Quote