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Old 01-29-2009, 04:34 PM   #1
crutledge
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Deland, Margaret: The Iron Woman. V1. 29 Jan 2009

Margaret Deland (nee Margaretta Wade Campbell) (February 23, 1857 - January 13, 1945) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and poet. She also wrote an autobiography in two volumes.
She was born in Allegheny, Pennsylvania (today a part of Pittsburgh). In 1880 she married Lorin F. Deland. They took in and supported unmarried mothers; it was at this period she began to write. Her poetry collection The Old Garden was published in 1886. Deland received a Litt.D. from Bates College in 1920.
She is known principally for the novel John Ward, Preacher (1888), and her 'Old Chester' books, based on her early memories of Maple Grove and Manchester, Pittsburgh communities where she grew up.

The Iron Woman is a novel of manners set in the 19th century fictional locale of Mercer, an Ohio River community that represents Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
The novel tells the story of Mrs. Maitland, a leathery old widow who owns and operates an iron mill. Her devotion to a Puritanical work ethic alienates her son Blair, who though he stands to inherit the business, is headstrong and in love with Elizabeth Ferguson, a match Mrs. Maitland disapproves of.
It was first published in installments in Harper's Monthly from November 1910 through October 1911.
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