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Old 12-03-2008, 03:06 PM   #22
Tattncat
Bookworm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HarryT View Post
I wonder if perhaps this is an easier book to "get" for British readers than American, simply because, as Richard says, we have an much more intuitive "feel" for the "class system" (which, as Richard notes, is very much still "alive and kicking" today, despite what some may think). Even the most enlightened Edwardian (which Forster was) would almost certainly have believed that the British were more "civilized" than the native Indian people, and it would be a rare Englishman (or woman) indeed at that time who could regard a "native" as their truly social equal. We look upon such attitudes as terrible today, but there's no doubt whatsoever that they were almost universally held to be true at the time of this book's writing.
I think you are probably right. I am from the United States and the class system escaped me. Also for Dixigal re (
(I was just tossing out examples of ways to think about what is being read, not trying to be bossy or anything. Those are some techniques that help me with literary criticism, made for some truly spectacular grades in college. I never even got a chance to start this particular book!)

Now I'm curious and want to pick your brain. Has the book changed the way you would respond to someone who shows prejudice? If yes, how has it changed?) No. I have always found any type of prejudice distasteful and hopefully seldom if ever stoop to prejudice.
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